When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Argentina

LGBTQ Plus

LGBTQ+ International: Slovenia Legalizes Same-Sex Marriage, Outed In Nollywood — And The Week’s Other Top News

Welcome to Worldcrunch’s LGBTQ+ International. We bring you up-to-speed each week on a topic you may follow closely at home, but can now see from different places and perspectives around the world. Discover the latest news on everything LGBTQ+ — from all corners of the planet. All in one smooth scroll!

This week featuring:

Watch VideoShow less

Jehovah's Witnesses Translate The Bible In Indigenous Language — Is This Colonialism?

The Jehovah's Witnesses in Chile have launched a Bible version translated into the native Mapudungun language, evidently indifferent to the concerns of a nation striving to save its identity from the Western cultural juggernaut.

NEUQUÉN — The Bible can now be read in Mapuzugun, the language of the Mapuche, an ancestral nation living across Chile and Argentina. It took the Chilean branch of the Jehovah's Witnesses, a latter-day Protestant church often associated with door-to-door proselytizing and cold calling, three years to translate it into "21st-century Mapuzugun".

The church's Mapuche members in Chile welcomed the book when it was launched in Santiago last June, but some of their brethren see it rather as a cultural imposition. The Mapuche were historically a fighting nation, and fiercely resisted both the Spanish conquerors and subsequent waves of European settlers. They are still fighting for land rights in Chile.

Keep reading...Show less

When Friends "Break Up" — The Psychological Damage After Friendships End

Society sees friendships as far less important than love and life partnerships. But psychologists warn that the end of a close friendship can leave the "grieving" side in need of therapy.

BUENOS AIRES — It was Wednesday and Sofía, a 31-year-old woman living in Buenos Aires, was having a good day. She'd had a productive work meeting in the morning and her usual gym class in the afternoon. But as she walked home listening to music in her earphones, she felt an acute pain, first in her chest, then throat.

It wasn't a heart attack, but she panicked and began to cry. What prompted the reaction, she realized later, was the music she had just heard: a song that brought back teenage memories of a former friend. Sofía told her therapist the next day that the end of the friendship had upset her greatly, and until that moment had suppressed the grief.

The friend hadn't died, there had been no fight or exchange of ugly words, but the two had drifted apart, irreversibly, Sofía felt. None of this, she told the psychologist, made it any less troubling or hurtful.

The song that had triggered her anxiety was 11 y 6 by Argentine Fito Páez. It took Sofía back to her 16th birthday, which she spent with her friend. That girl "was" her teenage years, she explained and without her "a big part of what we lived together now is gone."

The end of a strong friendship causes bona fide grief, even if it is often ignored. More and more specialists believe that it needs to be processed, and perhaps treated, like one would the end of a love affair or partnership.

Keep reading...Show less

Papá, Papá, On Repeat: Are We Men Ready For Fatherhood To Change Our Lives?

How many men are willing to change their lives when they become fathers? For Argentine journalist Ignacio Pereyra, becoming his son's main caregiver showed just how difficult caring for a child can be.

There is a moment on Saturday or Sunday, after having spent ten hours with my kids, that I get a little exasperated, I lose my patience. I find it hard to identify the emotion, I definitely feel some guilt too. I know that time alone with them improves our relationship... but I get bored! Yes, I feel bored. I want some time in the car for them to talk to each other while I can talk about the stupid things we adults talk about.

This is what a friend tells me. He tends to spend several weekends alone with his two children and prefers to make plans with other people instead of being alone with them. As I listened to him, I immediately remembered my long days with Lorenzo, my son, now three-and-a-half years old. I thought especially of the first two-and-a-half years of his life, when he hardly went to daycare (thanks, COVID!) and we’d spend the whole day together.

It also reminded me of a question I often ask myself in moments of boredom — which I had virtually ignored in my life before becoming a father: how willing are we men to let fatherhood change our lives?

It is clear that the routines and habits of a couple change completely when they have children, although we also know that this rarely happens equally.

With the arrival of a child, men continue to work as much or more than before, while women face a different reality: either they double their working day — maintaining a paid job but adding household and care tasks — or they are forced to abandon all or part of their paid work to devote themselves to caregiving.

In other words, "the arrival of a child tends to strengthen the role of economic provider in men (...), while women reinforce their role as caregivers," says an extensive Equimundo report on Latin America and the Caribbean, highlighting a trend that repeats itself in most Western countries.

Keep reading...Show less
Ideas
Esteban Actis and Nicolás Creus*

Why The New World Order Is Taking So Long To Get Here

A relative loss of power by sovereign states to non-state actors, as well as China's ascent, are part of a wider reshaping of power structures that is tense, "anarchic" and far from complete.

-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — In his book The Future of Power (2011), analyst Joseph S. Nye observed in the early 21st century a double transformation of power in the international order. It was a process of both diffusion and transition of power.

In the first case, power had begun to shift from sovereign states to a range of non-state actors with agendas that were outside national interests and state control. The latter refers to a displacement of the epicenter of world economic power from West to East.

A decade later, the evolution has become starker.

Watch VideoShow less
LGBTQ Plus
Worldcrunch

LGBTQ+ International: The Queen’s Mixed Legacy, Acceptance On Ukraine Frontlines — And The Week’s Other Top News

Welcome to Worldcrunch’s LGBTQ+ International. We bring you up-to-speed each week on a topic you may follow closely at home, but can now see from different places and perspectives around the world. Discover the latest news on everything LGBTQ+ — from all corners of the planet. All in one smooth scroll!

This week featuring:

Watch VideoShow less
In The News
Lisa Berdet, Chloé Touchard, Lila Paulou and Bertrand Hauger

Kirchner Survives Assassination Attempt, “Violated” Nuclear Plant, Edit That Tweet

👋 Salve!*

Welcome to Friday, where former Argentine President Cristina Kirchner survives an assassination attempt, the team of UN nuclear experts reports initial findings at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant, and Twitter tests a much-awaited “edit” button. Meanwhile, in Polish daily Gazeta Wyborcza, Paweł Smoleński tells the story of Marianna, a pregnant doctor from Mariupol who’s been abducted and held captive by Russians.

[*Latin]

Watch VideoShow less
Society
Miguel Espejo

Terror And Silence: Reading Kafka In Prague After Rushdie Stabbing

On the political left, writers and intellectuals around the world have shown a chilling indifference to the recent attack on the author Salman Rushdie. But this is not the first time they have quietly taken the side of the enemies of freedom.

-OpEd-

PRAGUE — Recently I recalled an observation made in 1979 by the Czech writer Milan Kundera when speaking at Mexico's National Autonomous University: He said Franz Kafka, another Czech and a defining figure of 20th-century literature, is unacceptable to the totalitarian world because his work is the very picture of that world.

The memory of this quote came to me in Prague, while attending an international symposium on Kafka and Latin American literature. Kundera cited a litany of prohibitions imposed on Kafka's work in authoritarian regimes, where the individual must submit to arbitrary instructions, the sources of which are, literally, mysteries.

Watch VideoShow less
LGBTQ Plus

LGBTQ+ International: Argentine Trans Icon Murder, Fleeing Russia, Bad Bunny Kiss — And The Week’s Other Top News

Welcome to Worldcrunch’s LGBTQ+ International. We bring you up-to-speed each week on a topic you may follow closely at home, but can now see from different places and perspectives around the world. Discover the latest news on everything LGBTQ+ — from all corners of the planet. All in one smooth scroll!

This week featuring:

Watch VideoShow less
LGBTQ Plus
Agustina Ramos

Meet Karina Pintarelli: The First Recognized Trans Survivor Of Argentina’s Dictatorship

Now 64, the transgender poet and activist suffered police torture under the military dictatorship of the 1970s and 1980s. After a long legal fight, she became the first trans victim of the regime to be granted monetary reparations by the Argentine Justice Ministry for persecution inflicted because of her gender identity.

BUENOS AIRES — From a house she shares with three friends, the trans activist and poet Karina Pintarelli, values above all the chance to rest. It’s the privilege of a survivor, at 64, of a life marked by multiple acts of violence as if tattooed on her skin.

On July 15, while she was sleeping, the envelope arrived with the news that ended the fight of her last five years. The Ministry of Justice and Human Rights of Argentina recognized the violence and persecution she suffered due to her gender identity during the military dictatorship of the 1970s and 1980s. Thus, she became the first trans person to receive reparation of this type from the government.

Watch VideoShow less
Green
Camila Parodi

The Dark Hidden Cost Of The Mineral That Makes Green Energy Possible

As the world moves to renewable energy, demand for lithium has surged. But the race to extract the precious mineral comes with hidden costs for local communities and the environment. So just how green is the energy transition after all?

We know that the transition to renewable energies is urgent and that fossil fuels must be replaced. But are we making the same mistake if we switch to extracting other resources using the same model?

Since 1997, U.S. company Livent has been extracting lithium, a metal that is crucial for renewable technologies, from the Salar del Hombre Muerto, a salt flat in northern Argentina.

Watch VideoShow less
Society
Maxi Kronenberg

Her Mad Existence: The Ultimate Collection Of Evita Perón Iconography

Seventy years after her death, displays in Buenos Aires, including a vast collection of pictures shown online, recall the life and times of "Evita" Perón, the Argentine first lady turned icon of popular culture.

BUENOS AIRES — Her death in 1952 at the age of 33 helped turn the Argentine first lady Eva Perón — known to millions as Evita — into one of the iconic faces of the 20th century, alongside other Argentines like the singer Carlos Gardel, the guerrilla leader Ernesto "Che" Guevara, and soccer stars Maradona and Messi.

Evita, née María Eva Duarte, became for many the defender of the poor — and to her detractors, the mother of Latin America's brazen populists — as she pushed for civil rights, gender equality and social programs for the poor in her time as first lady of Argentina in the mid-20th century.

Watch VideoShow less
EXPLORE OTHER TOPICS
chinaitalyusafrancegermany