When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

Business Is Business: Why Bolsonaro's Days May Be Numbered

Business sectors fear the now less popular President Jair Bolsonaro's bid to retain power will pave the way for another "red" government under Lula da Silva.

Photo of a hand holding a sign with Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro's face, with the slogan "Out Bolsonaro!!!"

"Out Bolsonaro"

Marcelo Cantelmi

-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — Brazil is presently like a candle burning at both ends. The populist government of President Jair Bolsonaro is increasingly rejected by poorer voters and the middle class amid an economic crisis. This is hurting his popularity rates and thus, reelection chances ahead of next year's race. Markets are also signaling that they have lost some of their confidence in a supposedly business-friendly government.

Most recently, they reacted badly to a decision by Bolsonaro and his economy minister, Paulo Guedes, to discard limits on public spending and boost social allocations to restore the president's battered electoral profile. The final headache, for now, is the Brazilian Senate's harsh report on Bolsonaro's handling of a pandemic that has killed 600,000 Brazilians. Its inquiry was the work of a multiparty commission led by the conservative Senator Renan Calheiros of the Brazilian Democratic Movement. This is an old and powerful party once allied with the Workers' Party (PT) before crucially voting in 2016 to impeach the socialist President Dilma Rousseff, paving the way for Bolsonaro's presidency.

Keep reading... Show less
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Society

Urban Indigenous: How Peru's Shipibo-Conibo Keep Amazon Culture Alive In The City

For four years, indigenous photographer David Díaz Gonzales has documented the lives and movements of his Shipibo-Conibo community, as many of them migrated from their native Peruvian Amazon to the city. A work of remembrance and resistance.

For Shipibo-Conibo women, sporting a fringe is usually a sign of celebration or ceremony.

Rosa Chávez Yacila

YARINACOCHA — It was decades ago when the Shipibo-Conibo left their settlements along the banks of the Ucayali River, in eastern Peru, to begin a great migration to the cities. Still among the largest Amazonian communities in Peru — 32,964 according to the Ministry of Culture — though most Shipibo-Conibo now live in the urban district of Yarinacocha.

Keep reading... Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch Video Show less
MOST READ