When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Metro accident in Mexico City that killed at least 23
Metro accident in Mexico City that killed at least 23

Welcome to Tuesday, where at least 23 die in a Mexico city metro accident, Bill & Melinda are splitting up and Japan spends COVID relief money on a giant squid statue. Les Echos also tells us about the pandemic-linked spike in anosmia cases, a.k.a. "smell blindness' and the impact on France's renowned wine tasters.

Deadly Mexico City metro accident: At least 23 people were killed and dozens injured when a rail overpass and subway train collapsed in Mexico City on Monday night. Firefighters and rescue workers are still searching for survivors.

• Netanyahu faces deadline to form government: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has until midnight on Tuesday to put together a new coalition government or his leading Likud party might become part of the opposition for the first time in 12 years.

• 33 killed in Burkina Faso village attack: Some 100 suspected jihadists killed at least 33 people, including children, in an eastern Burkina Faso village on Monday morning.

• Biden raises refugee cap above 62,000: President Joe Biden raised the number of refugees that will be admitted in the country to 62,500, after facing harsh criticism from Democrats for not changing the Trump-era limit.

• Germany dismantles global child porn network: German police have shut down one of the biggest darknet child pornography network in the world with more than 400,000 members. Four of its members were detained in Germany and Paraguay.

• Bill & Melinda Gates will divorce: The Microsoft founder and his wife have announced their decision to divorce after 27 years of marriage, raising questions about the future of their multi-billion-dollar philanthropic foundation.

• Japan town builds giant squid statue with COVID money: A seaside town used funding from an emergency COVID-19 relief grant to build a 13-meter-long squid statue. City officials said it was part of a plan to attract tourists back when the pandemic is over.

Keep reading... Show less
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

NATO Entry For Sweden And Finland? Erdogan May Not Be Bluffing

When the two Nordic countries confirmed their intention to join NATO this week, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan repeated his plans to block the application. Accusing Sweden and Finland of' "harboring" some of his worst enemies may not allow room for him to climb down.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared opposition to Finland and Sweden entering NATO

Meike Eijsberg

-Analysis-

LONDON — When Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared his opposition to Finland and Sweden entering NATO, it took most of the West's top diplomatic experts by surprise — with the focus squarely on how Russia would react to having two new NATO members in the neighborhood. (So far, that's been a surprise too)

But now Western oversight on Turkey's stance has morphed into a belief in some quarters that Erdogan is just bluffing, trying to get concessions from the negotiations over such a key geopolitical issue.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

To be clear, any prospective NATO member requires the consent of all 30 member states and their parliaments. So Erdogan does indeed have a card to play, which is amplified by the sense of urgency: NATO, Sweden and Finland are keen to complete the accession process with the war in Ukraine raging and the prospect of strengthening the military alliance's position around the Baltic Sea.

Keep reading... Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch Video Show less
MOST READ