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Why Classic Fender Guitars Are Striking A Chord With Gen Z

With the electric guitar in full revival thanks to the pandemic, the mythical Fender brand is reviving the glory days of rock and roll stars. Taking advantage of free time during lockdown, many Americans discovered their passion for the classic six-string.

Why Classic Fender Guitars Are Striking A Chord With Gen Z

Fender Musical Instruments Corporation has just celebrated its 75th anniversary in an impressive shape

Benoît Georges

CORONA — Kurt Cobain died 28 years ago, but you can still buy his favorite guitar. To mark the 30th anniversary of Nirvana’s classic album “Nevermind” last year, Fender reissued the so-called Jag-Stang. Fender invented the instrument in 1994 at Cobain's request by combining two different electric guitars, the Jaguar and the Mustang.

Or do you prefer The Pretenders to Nirvana? A brand new replica of lead singer and guitarist Chrissie Hynde's light blue 1965 Telecaster is also available. And if you still admire Eric Clapton (in spite of his anti-vaccine statements), you should know that his black Stratocaster, nicknamed "Blackie," is still made in Fender's California factory.

Founded in 1946 — also the year David Gilmour (Pink Floyd), Robert Fripp (King Crimson) and Robby Krieger (The Doors) were born — Fender Musical Instruments Corporation has just celebrated its 75th anniversary in an impressive shape. Its sales increased by 30% last year, and the turnover of the first American manufacturer of musical instruments should exceed $800 million for the first time in its history. Another sign that its products are in demand: the company raised its prices by an average of 10% last year.

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Society

Urban Indigenous: How Peru's Shipibo-Conibo Keep Amazon Culture Alive In The City

For four years, indigenous photographer David Díaz Gonzales has documented the lives and movements of his Shipibo-Conibo community, as many of them migrated from their native Peruvian Amazon to the city. A work of remembrance and resistance.

For Shipibo-Conibo women, sporting a fringe is usually a sign of celebration or ceremony.

Rosa Chávez Yacila

YARINACOCHA — It was decades ago when the Shipibo-Conibo left their settlements along the banks of the Ucayali River, in eastern Peru, to begin a great migration to the cities. Still among the largest Amazonian communities in Peru — 32,964 according to the Ministry of Culture — though most Shipibo-Conibo now live in the urban district of Yarinacocha.

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