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Elderly citizens are waiting to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at Luna Park Stadium in Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Elderly citizens are waiting to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at Luna Park Stadium in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Welcome to Wednesday, where Myanmar's military hires a PR company, U.S. state of Arkansas bans abortions and a hologram is projected of the giant Buddha destroyed 20 years ago by the Taliban. We've also translated a Jeune Afrique article that follows the fight of a Moroccan collective trying to repeal a bill which criminalizes sexual relations outside marriage.

• 1 in 3 women victims of violence: A landmark WHO report reveals that one in three women globally have been victims of violence or sexual assault at least once in their lives, a number that has not decreased in the past two decades. The World Health Organisation study is the largest ever to track the prevalence of violence in 161 countries aimed at women and girls age 15 and up was collected between 2000 and 2018 — so does not account for the pandemic.

• Brazil hospitals overrun: Brazil again breaks its daily COVID-19 death toll record, as its health institute warns that hospitals are close to collapse.

• Myanmar junta hires PR firm: Myanmar's generals hire Canadian lobbying firm Dickens & Madson for $2 milion to work on their behalf as the military appears to be taking a more deadly stand in quelling pro-democracy protests.

• Russia to slow Twitter: Russia has announced that it will throttle Twitter speeds, effectively preventing the viewing of photos and videos, citing "illegal content" on the platform.

• Arkansas bans abortions: The U.S. state of Arkansas has passed the strictest abortion ban in the country, part of a conservative effort to bring the issue to the Supreme Court to overturn the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling.

• China and Russia to build space station: The two countries have agreed to jointly construct a lunar space station that will be open to research and visits from "all countries."

• Thai PM douses reporters: In an effort to dodge reporters' questions on a possible cabinet reshuffle, Thailand's Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha misted the audience multiple times with hand sanitizer spray.

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Geopolitics

Our 'Emotional' Divide: How The Ukraine War Reveals A World Broken In Two

Russia's invasion has created a stark global divide: them and us. On one side are the countries refusing to condemn Moscow, with the West on the other. It's a dangerous split that could have repercussions far into the future.

Protesters against the war in Ukraine demonstrate in front of the Russian embassy in London

Dominique Moïsi

-Analysis-

PARIS — "The West and the Rest of Us." That's the title of a 1975 essay written by Nigerian essayist and critic Chinweizu Ibekwe. I've been thinking about his words as the war in Ukraine both reveals and accelerates divisions of the world that I believe are ultimately "emotional" in nature.

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With war returning to Europe and the risk of escalation, there is a gap between the Western view and that of the "others," a distinct "us and them." This gap cannot be explained in strictly geographical, political, and economic terms.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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