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A volunteer firefighter helps put out the massive fire that broke out yesterday at a chemical plant in Rockton, Illinois. Residents within a one-mile radius of the site have been evacuated, as authorities warn that the blaze could last for days.
A volunteer firefighter helps put out the massive fire that broke out yesterday at a chemical plant in Rockton, Illinois. Residents within a one-mile radius of the site have been evacuated, as authorities warn that the blaze could last for days.

Welcome to Tuesday, where Japan's Prime Minister survives a vote of no confidence one month before the Olympic Games, the UK delays its reopening for fears of the Delta variant spreading and a devilishly high roller coaster opens in New Jersey. New Delhi-based news website The Wire also looks at the need for comprehensive development planning for post-pandemic India, both in cities and the countryside.

• China snaps back at NATO: In a communique signed by NATO leaders at the behest of U.S. President Joe Biden, the security alliance recognized the "systemic challenges' China poses to the "rules-based international order." In response, Beijing has called the statement slanderous, urging NATO to stop "hyping up in any form the so-called ‘China threat.""

• Japan PM survives no-confidence vote: Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga and his majority party survived a vote of no confidence. Opposition parties have criticized the government's handling of the COVID-19 pandemic and the full-steam-ahead approach to the Olympic Games.

• Russian mercenaries accused of atrocities in Central African Republic: A CNN investigation has uncovered evidence that Russian mercenaries indiscriminately fired upon civilians while hunting the rebel group, Seleka, in Bambari, Central African Republic in February, which may amount to war crimes.

• Duterte refuses to cooperate with ICC probe: The International Criminal Court (ICC) announced that it is seeking authorization to investigate the Philippines' violent war on drugs, citing possible crimes against humanity. President Rodrigo Duterte has stated he will not cooperate with the investigation, noting that he had revoked the country's ICC membership in 2018,.

• Delta variant delays UK reopening: The United Kingdom has delayed its full reopening by four weeks over concerns regarding the spreading Delta variant, after being slated to lift the majority of remaining restrictions on June 21. Meanwhile, Brazilian President Bolsanro has asked Pfizer to speed up its vaccine delivery.

• IKEA France found guilty of spying on staff: After being found guilty of illegally collecting private information on staff from 2009-2012, IKEA France has been ordered to pay a fine of €1 million In addition to this penalty, the former IKEA France CEO was sentenced to two years in jail and a €50,000 individual fine.

• Police arrest fast food workers for not giving them free burgers: All 19 staff members at the fast food chain Johnny & Jugnu in Lahore, Pakistan were arrested and held overnight after refusing to give free burgers to a group of police officers. The officers involved have been suspended.

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AL JAZEERA
Al Jazeera is a state-funded broadcaster in Doha, Qatar, owned by the Al Jazeera Media Network. Initially launched as an Arabic news and current-affairs satellite TV channel, Al Jazeera has since expanded into a network with several outlets, including the Internet and specialty television channels in multiple languages.
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REUTERS
Reuters is an international news agency headquartered in London, UK. It was founded in 1851 and is now a division of Thomson Reuters. It transmits news in English, French, Arabic, Spanish, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Japanese, Korean, Urdu, and Chinese.
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CNN
CNN (Cable News Network) is a multinational news organization and TV channel. Headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, it is part of the Warner Media group and was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner and Reese Schonfeld.
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THE NEW YORK TIMES
The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated to NYT) is an American daily newspaper, founded and continuously published in New York City since 1851. It has won 117 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other news organization. Its daily circulation is estimated to 1,380,000.
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THE WIRE
The Wire is a news website available in English and Hindi, was founded in 2015 in New Delhi. It is published by the Foundation for Independent Journalism (FIJ), a non-profit Indian company.
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MILLIYET
Milliyet ("The Nation") is a major Turkish language daily published in Istanbul. It was founded in 1950. It is owned by the Demirören Holding conglomerate, and its political alignment is considered center-left.
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BBC
The BBC is the British public service broadcaster, and the world's oldest national broadcasting organization. It broadcasts in up to 28 different languages.
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THE GUARDIAN
Founded as a local Manchester newspaper in 1821, The Guardian has gone on to become one of the most influential dailies in Britain. The left-leaning newspaper is most recently known for its coverage of the Edward Snowden leaks.
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Society

Urban Indigenous: How Peru's Shipibo-Conibo Keep Amazon Culture Alive In The City

For four years, indigenous photographer David Díaz Gonzales has documented the lives and movements of his Shipibo-Conibo community, as many of them migrated from their native Peruvian Amazon to the city. A work of remembrance and resistance.

For Shipibo-Conibo women, sporting a fringe is usually a sign of celebration or ceremony.

Rosa Chávez Yacila

YARINACOCHA — It was decades ago when the Shipibo-Conibo left their settlements along the banks of the Ucayali River, in eastern Peru, to begin a great migration to the cities. Still among the largest Amazonian communities in Peru — 32,964 according to the Ministry of Culture — though most Shipibo-Conibo now live in the urban district of Yarinacocha.

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