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Moviegoers at the AMC Theater on the first day of reopening for theaters which had been closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Burbank, California
Moviegoers at the AMC Theater on the first day of reopening for theaters which had been closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Burbank, California

Welcome to Tuesday, where Europe faces an AstraZeneca panic, North Korea has its first words for Joe Biden and movie theaters reopen in Hollywood. We also explore the world of "biomimicry," where new technologies are created in the image of nature.

• AstraZeneca suspended across Europe: Germany, France, Italy, Spain, and other European countries suspend the anti-COVID vaccine after a small handful of reports that AstraZeneca caused blood clots. The WHO, which continues to recommend its use, is scheduled to meet with the European Medicines Agency (EMA) today. Meanwhile, China will issue travel visas to foreigners who get their homegrown vaccine.

• Mozambique insurgency crisis: International aid group Save the Children sounds alarm on humanitarian crisis following reports that children as young as 11 are being beheaded by jihadist insurgency.

• Australia #March4Justice protests: Tens of thousands of people in 47 locations across Australia take to the streets to protest sexual violence and gender discrimination in the workplace.

• New discovery of Dead Sea Scrolls: Israeli archaeologists say they've discovered dozens of new Dead Sea Scroll fragments bearing a biblical text dating nearly 1,900 years ago.

• Bond villain dead: Yaphet Kotto, the actor, best known for his role as the evil Dr. Kananga in the 1973 Bond movie Live and Let Die, has died at the age of 81.

• Tinder background checks: The popular dating app has announced plans to offer in-app background checks, beginning in the U.S.

• France to return Nazi era art: After being "sold" by an Austrian Jewish woman more than 80 years ago, France will return a painting by artist Gustav Klimt to his heirs.

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Geopolitics

Our 'Emotional' Divide: How The Ukraine War Reveals A World Broken In Two

Russia's invasion has created a stark global divide: them and us. On one side are the countries refusing to condemn Moscow, with the West on the other. It's a dangerous split that could have repercussions far into the future.

Protesters against the war in Ukraine demonstrate in front of the Russian embassy in London

Dominique Moïsi

-Analysis-

PARIS — "The West and the Rest of Us." That's the title of a 1975 essay written by Nigerian essayist and critic Chinweizu Ibekwe. I've been thinking about his words as the war in Ukraine both reveals and accelerates divisions of the world that I believe are ultimately "emotional" in nature.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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With war returning to Europe and the risk of escalation, there is a gap between the Western view and that of the "others," a distinct "us and them." This gap cannot be explained in strictly geographical, political, and economic terms.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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