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LA MAREA
La Marea is a monthly paper magazine and a daily digital medium that is committed to rigorous and in depth journalism, specialized in analysis, research and culture. The publication is edited by the MásPúblico cooperative, 100% owned by its readers and workers, which allows us to be totally independent from political and business powers.
A Fascist poster hangs on a wall inside ​Benito Mussolin's former home in Forli, Italy
Society
Olivia Carballar

We Still Don't Know How To Fight Fascism

It's no longer accurate to say the "rise" of the far-right — fascism is already here. After Trump's election, a group of prominent analysts gathered to discuss how the left could fight back. Six years later, their insights are more urgent and insightful than ever.

-Essay-

MADRID — There were very few who'd ventured to predict that he would win. That night, Nov. 8, 2016, we in Europe went to sleep watching the United States, and woke up in the middle of a nightmare. Donald Trump, whom both the Republican and Democratic establishments and opinion makers had dismissed, had become real. He had won.

Far-right leaders scattered around the world began to send congratulations while protests began to take place in North American cities. The pundits couldn't understand why their brilliant analyses had failed.

Six years later, fascism continues to triumph, for the simple reason that people continue to vote for it. In Italy, it won last Sunday with Giorgia Meloni. The Vox party arrived in Spain a long time ago.

But no one can say that we were not warned. In December 2016, with the arrival of Trump to power,weat La Marea organized a debate to collect the responses the left was devising in the face of this wave that threatens the basic principles of a democracy. They were interesting then, but perhaps they are even more relevant now because they were never implemented.

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It's Neoliberalism, Stupid: A Millennial's Plea To Break The Status Quo
Society
Azahara Palomeque

It's Neoliberalism, Stupid: A Millennial's Plea To Break The Status Quo

I am part of a generation whose quality of life will be worse than those who came before us. This should encourage society to realize that the idea of infinite growth is a myth, and that time is of the essence when it comes to saving the environment.

-Essay-

Millennials (those aged roughly between 25 and 38) and others born after us will never be able to live better than our parents (or grandparents). There are those who will blame Netflix subscriptions or avocado toast as a pattern of expenses that, if avoided, would allow us in theory to buy a house. But the economic data is there and it doesn’t lie.

Economic growth has slowed down in a good part of the globe and, along with this, there has been a weakening of the welfare states in most Western countries. This has been coupled with a reduction in taxes for those who are the wealthiest, resulting in unprecedented wealth inequality.

Demonizing the leisure activities of the most precarious sectors not only demonstrates a conservative and prejudiced position but also a shameless ignorance in the face of a problem that has been studied by many experts.

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Who Will Be Left? A Message From The "Inextinguishable" Fires Of Zamora
Green
Cristina García Casado

Who Will Be Left? A Message From The "Inextinguishable" Fires Of Zamora

The droughts and extreme temperatures due to climate change, together with the abandonment of the countryside, have caused fierce fires in Spain that have devastate the livelihoods of the few people who still live there.

TÁBARA — Francisco Vicente and Delia spent two days inside a tractor. In their town, Tábara, in the northwestern Spanish province of Zamora, the flames tried to enter from all fronts for hours without mercy or truce.

Many neighbors, like them, disregarded the Civil Guard's eviction order and stayed behind to defend their houses, their crops and their animals. This is all they have. The official fire extinguishing techniques are not designed for the massive fires of the 21st century.

"If the people hadn't stayed behind, the fire would have reached the town and burned it," says Francisco Vicente Casado Fresno, a farmer, just like his father, grandparents, uncles and those who preceded them.

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Maasai people
Society
Fiore Longo

Plight Of Maasai Reveals Racism Of Africa's Conservation Policy

Thousands of Maasai people in Tanzania met brutal police repression when they demonstrated against being expelled from their land, laying bare both how ineffective and inhumane the conservationist movement can be.

LOLIONDO — "Loliondo is bleeding..."

An SMS woke me up on the morning of June 10. Scrolling through my phone were dozens of horrifying images of Maasai men and women with wounds on their legs, their backs and their heads. Lots of blood. And then, videos of Maasai running away from the Tanzanian police, who were shooting at them.

The pictures looked like war images. Like so many other people in the Global North, I was shocked. How could the idyllic images of zebras, giraffes and lions that the Serengeti ecosystem evokes in Western minds be transformed into this scene of brutal violence?

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Real Fear, Fake Politics: How U.S. Gun Culture Looks To A Foreigner Living There
Society
Azahara Palomeque

Real Fear, Fake Politics: How U.S. Gun Culture Looks To A Foreigner Living There

U.S. politics around gun control can be confusing to Americans but outright bewildering to foreigners living there. For Azahara Palomeque, a Spaniard who just left the U.S. after 12 years, the country is governed by a "necropolitics" that doesn't value life.

-Essay-

MADRID — On the day of the massacre in Uvalde, Texas, where an 18-year-old boy gunned down 19 children and two of their teachers, I was at the Philadelphia airport, ready to leave the country that had been my home for more than 12 years. As I read the news from the boarding gate, I murmured "again, another f*cking time the same thing."

I prayed that the plane would take off as soon as possible and that the journey would make me forget not only that massacre but all the deaths that happen gratuitously in the United States on a daily basis, preventable were it not for the greed of its politicians, almost all sold to the big lobbies that finance their careers.

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Orhan Pamuk at an event.
Society
Manuel Ligero

Orhan Pamuk On Pandemics, Press Freedom And An Eye On Erdogan's Defeat

Nights of Plague is the latest book by the Turkish Nobel Prize winner, a fictional rendering based on historical reality that draws parallels (political and health-wise) between the past and the present.

MADRID — Orhan Pamuk is a kind of Bosphorus Bridge of literature: He unites two continents, two cultures, two philosophical and religious visions that have, over the centuries, tenaciously turned their backs on each other.

In his country, as the authoritarian drift of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has deepened, the author and public intellectual has progressively become a thorn in the side of the government. However, his run-ins with the Islamo-nationalist regime have not made a dent in his cheerful and optimistic personality.

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Picture of ruins in Dnipro after Russian invasion
FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War
Patricia Simón

Traitor, Spy, Pro-Russian: Ukrainians Who Question Kyiv Face Grave Accusations

In Ukraine, those who do not want to fight on the front or who want negotiations cannot say so publicly for fear of accusations of being traitors.

“I don't want to fight. They are sending the soldiers to almost certain death because they have far less means than the Russians. Also, I don't think that (President Volodomyr) Zelensky, Europe or the United States have negotiated enough to try to stop this war. But, of course, you can't say that publicly, nor do we have a way to escape.”

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The young man speaking wants to preserve his anonymity. For uttering statements like this, he can be accused of desertion, collaboration with Russia, or being a traitor or a spy. He could also end up being sentenced to more than ten years in prison. Dimitry, a pseudonym to protect him, no longer even dares to talk about these issues by online chat with his friends.

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Photo of a worker assisting a resident down a stairwell at an elderly residential center, to evacuate her from Toretsk, Ukraine on April 13,​
Society
Patricia Simón

Up Close With Ukraine's Elderly, Left-Behind Victims Of The War

There are few children left in Kyiv and other Ukrainian cities, but there are many elderly people, trapped by their health in their homes. Their fate is a mirror of the tragic fate of a nation that was already aging before the war.

KYIV— "When I hear the bombs I get under the table and I cry like when I was a child during World War II," laments Eiludgarda Miroshnychenko.

To get to her house in the heart of the old center of Kyiv, just ten minutes by car from Maidan Square in normal circumstances, we had to pass through 15 checkpoints.

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But Eiludgarda doesn't know this because since the Russian invasion began, more than a month ago, she has only left home to go down to the neighborhood grocer a handful of times. She is 85 years old, has heart problems and is terrified that something will happen to her and that it will take her daughters hours to realize that something is wrong.

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