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LA MAREA
La Marea is a monthly paper magazine and a daily digital medium that is committed to rigorous and in depth journalism, specialized in analysis, research and culture. The publication is edited by the MásPúblico cooperative, 100% owned by its readers and workers, which allows us to be totally independent from political and business powers.
Orhan Pamuk at an event.
Society
Manuel Ligero

Orhan Pamuk On Pandemics, Press Freedom And An Eye On Erdogan's Defeat

Nights of Plague is the latest book by the Turkish Nobel Prize winner, a fictional rendering based on historical reality that draws parallels (political and health-wise) between the past and the present.

MADRID — Orhan Pamuk is a kind of Bosphorus Bridge of literature: He unites two continents, two cultures, two philosophical and religious visions that have, over the centuries, tenaciously turned their backs on each other.

In his country, as the authoritarian drift of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has deepened, the author and public intellectual has progressively become a thorn in the side of the government. However, his run-ins with the Islamo-nationalist regime have not made a dent in his cheerful and optimistic personality.

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Picture of ruins in Dnipro after Russian invasion
FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War
Patricia Simón

Traitor, Spy, Pro-Russian: Ukrainians Who Question Kyiv Face Grave Accusations

In Ukraine, those who do not want to fight on the front or who want negotiations cannot say so publicly for fear of accusations of being traitors.

“I don't want to fight. They are sending the soldiers to almost certain death because they have far less means than the Russians. Also, I don't think that (President Volodomyr) Zelensky, Europe or the United States have negotiated enough to try to stop this war. But, of course, you can't say that publicly, nor do we have a way to escape.”

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The young man speaking wants to preserve his anonymity. For uttering statements like this, he can be accused of desertion, collaboration with Russia, or being a traitor or a spy. He could also end up being sentenced to more than ten years in prison. Dimitry, a pseudonym to protect him, no longer even dares to talk about these issues by online chat with his friends.

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Photo of a worker assisting a resident down a stairwell at an elderly residential center, to evacuate her from Toretsk, Ukraine on April 13,​
Society
Patricia Simón

Up Close With Ukraine's Elderly, Left-Behind Victims Of The War

There are few children left in Kyiv and other Ukrainian cities, but there are many elderly people, trapped by their health in their homes. Their fate is a mirror of the tragic fate of a nation that was already aging before the war.

KYIV— "When I hear the bombs I get under the table and I cry like when I was a child during World War II," laments Eiludgarda Miroshnychenko.

To get to her house in the heart of the old center of Kyiv, just ten minutes by car from Maidan Square in normal circumstances, we had to pass through 15 checkpoints.

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But Eiludgarda doesn't know this because since the Russian invasion began, more than a month ago, she has only left home to go down to the neighborhood grocer a handful of times. She is 85 years old, has heart problems and is terrified that something will happen to her and that it will take her daughters hours to realize that something is wrong.

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Surrogate babies stranded in the basement of a building in Ukraine.​
Society
Patricia Simón

Ukraine Hopes These Surrogate Babies Will Stir The Conscience Of The West

BioTexCom is responsible for more than half of the 2,500 surrogate babies born annually in Ukraine. This is how, in the middle of the war, the surrogacy company continues to function.

KYIV — With his right hand, he moves the forceps, emulating how embryos are inserted into a woman's uterus. On the left, he holds the walkie-talkie used to communicate with the soldiers monitoring the surroundings of the clinic.

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Dr. Ihor Pechenoga, with three medical specialties, has been working since 2018 as a spokesperson for the surrogacy company BioTexCom, which is responsible for more than half of the 2,500 babies born annually in Ukraine through this procedure. When the Russian invasion began on February 24, he was appointed with the responsibility of protecting the clinic, located very close to the Kyiv front line.

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Academic Washing? How Spain's Energy Sector Cleans Its Image At Universities
Green
Dani Dominguez

Academic Washing? How Spain's Energy Sector Cleans Its Image At Universities

The big Spanish electricity and oil companies sponsor numerous research chairs at top universities: Is this cynical 'greenwashing' or innovative collaboration for the energy transition?

MADRID — Spain's major energy companies have found a first-rate partner in universities.

At Comillas University, for example, the companies sponsor the Module of Energy and Innovation, financed by Iberdrola; the Module of Family and Disability and the Module of Social Impact, in which the Repsol Foundation participates, as well as the Module of Energy and Poverty, run by Naturgy and Endesa.

In other words, the four big electricity companies on Spain's IBEX 35 leading stock index pay for some type of studies at this private university, which also hosts the Chair of Connected Industry; whose board of trustees includes Repsol, Endesa and Enagás, among others; and the Chair of Energy and Sustainability, which is paid for by British Petroleum (BP).

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