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Quantifying The Effects Of The Pandemic On Nonna's Cooking

Making ragù?

Mariateresa Fichele

Back in the early days of the pandemic, a study was carried out on a sample of about 100 women in their seventies. It showed that the day after they got their first shot against COVID-19:

• 80% of the respondents woke up early to start making ragù, the meat sauce. Of these, the majority made it with pork ribs (tracchiolelle), a minority with ground beef.

• 10% prepared oven-baked pasta. This is the most anxious category because "Dottoré, I have to hurry to turn on the oven.”

• 10% prepared pasta with tomato sauce, for matters of time and practicality. Worthy of note is a linguine dish with olives and capers prepared with tomato paste because "the sauce becomes thick and sticky”.

Finally, Anna, 79 years old, with multiple pathologies, six children, was excluded from the study. She prepared: cannelloni, ziti lardiati, gnocchi, stew with potatoes, potato croquettes and paste cresciute fritters.

"Dottoré, they say that I could die with AstraZeneca. So if today is to be my last lunch, I might as well have a good one..."


Learn more about Worldcrunch's exclusive Dottoré! series here.

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Society

Gun Violence In America: Don't Blame The Victims — That Means Rappers Too

The recent shooting of Takeoff, a rapper, is another sad incident of gun crime in the U.S. But those blaming hip hop culture for contributing to gun violence ignore that rappers themselves are also victims. And the real point is that in today's America, nobody is safe from gun violence.

Gun Violence In America: Don't Blame The Victims — That Means Rappers Too

Fans wait outside State Farm Arena in Atlanta to attend the memorial service for Migos rapper Takeoff on Nov. 11

A.D. Carson

Add the name of Takeoff, a member of the popular rap trio Migos, to the ever-growing list of rappers, recent and past, tragically and violently killed.

The initial reaction to the shooting to death of Takeoff, born Kirsnick Ball, on Nov. 1, was to blame rap music and hip hop culture. People who engaged in this kind of scapegoating argue that the violence and despairing hopelessness in the music are the cause of so many rappers dying.

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