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Dottoré!

Really, The Nerve Of These Women

Really, The Nerve Of These Women
Mariateresa Fichele

If I were running a company I would never hire women.

At least once a month they are sick, and in the days leading up to it, there are endless complaints.


If they’re nearing their thirties, they want to find a husband and have children. Then when they do, the real disaster begins.

Hysterical and impossible

First maternity leave, breastfeeding; and when they finally go back to work, they’re constantly out because of the children. Then they go through menopause, and I can't tell you how hysterical and impossible they become.

And all of them, no matter what age, are likely to start complaining at some point because they earn less than their male colleagues.

But what exactly do these women want?

Just because they are stronger, more clear-headed and determined than us men, do they think they can take over?

Why don't they just relax and stay in their place?

Biblical sufferings

What do they think, that we're going to open up daycare centers for them? That we’re going to support them as parents? As working mothers?

Women should accept their condition and listen to the Word of the Lord.

After all, it is written in the Bible: "You will give birth in pain!"

But they ask for anesthesia.

They can’t even accept having to suffer …

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Geopolitics

The Trumpian Virus Undermining Democracy Is Now Spreading Through South America

Taking inspiration from events in the United States over the past four years, rejection of election results and established state institutions is on the rise in Latin America.

Two supporters of far-right Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro dressed in Brazilian flags during a demonstration in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Bolsonaro supporters dressed in national colours with flags in a demonstration in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on November 4, 2022.

Ivan Abreu / ZUMA
Carlos Ruckauf*

-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — South Africa's Nelson Mandela used to say it was "so easy to break down and destroy. The heroes are those who make peace and build."

Intolerance toward those who think differently, even inside the same political space, is corroding the bases of representative democracy, which is the only system we know that allows us to live and grow in freedom, in spite of its flaws.

Recent events in South America and elsewhere are precisely alerting us to that danger. The most explosive example was in Brazil, where a crowd of thousands managed to storm key institutional premises like the presidential palace, parliament and the Supreme Court.

In Peru, the country's Marxist (now former) president, Pedro Castillo, sought to use the armed and security forces to shut down parliament and halt the Supreme Court and state prosecutors from investigating corruption allegations against him.

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