When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Peace goals
Peace goals
Ariela Piattelli

JERUSALEM — In front of Zion Gate in the heart of the Old City of Jerusalem, just a short walk from the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, lies a soccer pitch. Standing on the field, nestled beside an Armenian church, you can see the city walls and the rising minarets of mosques.

This pitch and the soccer academy surrounding it were built with funds donated by several notable figures in Italian sports, from soccer coach Carlo Ancelotti to Olympic swimmer Federica Pellegrini and motorcycle racer Valentino Rossi. The academy is run by the Italian soccer team AS Roma, and provides a unique experience in this divided city: Children from all backgrounds and religions — Arab, Israeli, Jewish, Christian, Muslim, and Armenian alike — play and train here together.

An opportunity to get to know each other better in a land where communication is often complicated.

"With the recent participation of the Armenian community, we've added another important piece of the cultural puzzle we're trying to build here," says Samuele Giannetti, vice president of the Roma Club Jerusalem. He and his organization have worked for years on this multicultural project, seeking to build dialogue on the soccer field and prove that people of all cultures can live together in harmony in Jerusalem.

For Giannetti and the academy, sport can be an antidote to ignorance, suspicion, and mistrust. "It's an instrument of reciprocal contact that goes far beyond the sport itself," says Giannetti. "If this pitch didn't exist these kids would never meet each other, whereas now they are bringing home an example of intercultural dialogue."

Hosted in the Armenian quarter, the academy was originally proposed by the Italian consulate in Jerusalem, which promoted the project with the support of the city's Armenian Patriarchate. "The school offers these children an opportunity to get to know each other better in a land where communication is often complicated," says Fabio Sokolowicz, the Italian consul.

Fabio Sonnino, president of the Roma Club Jerusalem, says the modest effort may at least offer another way into the peace process. "Our project is just a drop in the ocean," he says, "but it's a start."

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

New Probe Finds Pro-Bolsonaro Fake News Dominated Social Media Through Campaign

Ahead of Brazil's national elections Sunday, the most interacted-with posts on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Telegram and WhatsApp contradict trustworthy information about the public’s voting intentions.

Jair Bolsonaro bogus claims perform well online

Cris Faga/ZUMA
Laura Scofield and Matheus Santino

SÂO PAULO — If you only got your news from social media, you might be mistaken for thinking that Jair Bolsonaro is leading the polls for Brazil’s upcoming presidential elections, which will take place this Sunday. Such a view flies in the face of what most of the polling institutes registered with the Superior Electoral Court indicate.

An exclusive investigation by the Brazilian investigative journalism agency Agência Pública has revealed how the most interacted-with and shared posts in Brazil on social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Telegram and WhatsApp share data and polls that suggest victory is certain for the incumbent Bolsonaro, as well as propagating conspiracy theories based on false allegations that research institutes carrying out polling have been bribed by Bolsonaro’s main rival, former president Luís Inácio Lula da Silva, or by his party, the Workers’ Party.

Agência Pública’s reporters analyzed the most-shared posts containing the phrase “pesquisa eleitoral” [electoral polls] in the period between the official start of the campaigning period, on August 16, to September 6. The analysis revealed that the most interacted-with and shared posts on social media spread false information or predicted victory for Jair Bolsonaro.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ