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A major winter storm is hitting New York City where 13 inches of snow have fallen, the biggest winter storm in five years
A major winter storm is hitting New York City where 13 inches of snow have fallen, the biggest winter storm in five years

Welcome to Tuesday, where global calls are issued for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi, Navalny shows up in court and there's real-life drama at the French opera. Le Monde also goes to Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelensky's hometown to report on the disillusions, two years into his term.

• COVID-19 latest: Japan set to extend its state of emergency for another month as Tokyo Olympics loom. The U.S. administered more doses of the COVID-19 vaccine yesterday for the first time than those who have tested positive. Both Italy and South Africa have eased restrictions as the rate of infection eases to a more manageable level.

• Myanmar military coup: The party of democratically elected Aung San Suu Kyi has called for her release as the list of countries and international organizations denouncing the military coup is growing.

• Navalny makes court appearance: As protesters demand his release and riot police block off the court entrance and surrounding streets, Vladimir Putin's prime critic Alexy Navalny appeared in court for alleged parole violations.

• Biden to sign executive orders on immigration: President Joe Biden is set to sign three executive orders, one of which will help reunite the children who were separated from their parents at the border.

• Marilyn Manson abuse accusations: U.S. actress Evan Rachel Wood took to Instagram to accuse singer Marilyn Manson of abuse. At least four other women have also come forward with allegations of abuse.

• Two-million euro "thank you:" The village of Le Chambon-sur-Lignon in south-central France whose residents risked their lives to shelter Jews during World War II has received a two-million euro inheritance from an Austrian man who fled the Nazis with his family and hid in a school for seven years.

• Sweet job offer: A Canadian company is seeking workers to try and rate their candy, a position they call "candyologist."

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Ideas

García Márquez And Truth: How Journalism Fed The Novelist's Fantasy

In his early journalistic writings, the Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez showed he had an eye for factual details, in which he found the absurdity and 'magic' that would in time be the stuff and style of his fiction.

Colombian novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez reads his book

J. D. Torres Duarte

BOGOTÁ — In short stories written in the 1940s and early 50s and later compiled in Eyes of a Blue Dog, the late Gabriel García Márquez, Colombia's Nobel Prize-winning novelist, shows he is as yet a young writer, with a style and subjects that can be atypical.

Stylistically, García Márquez came into his own in the celebrated One Hundred Years of Solitude. Until then both his style and substance took an erratic course: touching the brevity of film scripts in Nobody Writes to the Colonel, technical experimentation in Leaf Storm, the anecdotal short novel in In Evil Hour or exploring politics in Big Mama's Funeral. Throughout, the skills he displayed were rather of a precocious juggler.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

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