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Marking International Women's Day in Bangladesh
Marking International Women's Day in Bangladesh

Welcome to Monday, where vaccination success in Israel and England allow easing of lockdown restrictions, the Pope concludes his historic trip in Iraq and Meghan and Harry have their say. Die Welt also looks at how the German police are taking advantage of a "WhatsApp for gangsters' to arrest gang criminals.

• COVID-19 latest: Israel lifts lockdown, allowing cafes, restaurants and events halls to reopen thanks to a successful vaccination campaign, which has fully immunized nearly 40% of its population in just over two months. Children return to classrooms in England, after two months of home-schooling, as the UK is also performing well in vaccinating its population. Meanwhile, Japan's inoculation campaign is hampered by a lack of supply and a shortage of specialty syringes.

• Equatorial Guinea explosions: A series of accidental explosions at a military barracks in Equatorial Guinea killed at least 20 and wounded more than 600 others.

• Harry, Meghan & Oprah: Racism, suicidal thoughts and family rifts are among the headline takeaways from the much anticipated Oprah Winfrey interview of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, aka, Harry and Megan.

Pope concludes historic Iraq trip: Pope Francis returned to Rome after a historic three-day trip to Iraq focused on interfaith dialogue, the nation's biblical roots and healing after years of war. Some criticized the trip for the risks it posed in spreading COVID-19 among the faithful.

• Niqab ban in Switzerland: Swiss voters narrowly approved a referendum banning face coverings in public, including the burqa and niqab.

• Dassault death: French politician and military aviation billionaire Olivier Dassault was killed yesterday in a helicopter crash.

• Game, set and Djokovic: Serbian tennis champion Novak Djokovic has broken Roger Federer's record for most weeks spent at the top of world tennis, with a grand total of 311 weeks.

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Reuters is an international news agency headquartered in London, UK. It was founded in 1851 and is now a division of Thomson Reuters. It transmits news in English, French, Arabic, Spanish, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Japanese, Korean, Urdu, and Chinese.
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Die Welt ("The World") is a German daily founded in Hamburg in 1946, and currently owned by the Axel Springer AG company, Europe's largest publishing house. Now based in Berlin, Die Welt is sold in more than 130 countries. A Sunday edition called Welt am Sonntag has been published since 1948.
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Two Ukrainian soldiers at a military base on the outskirts of the separatist region of Donetsk

Lisa Berdet, Lila Paulou, Anne-Sophie Goninet and Bertrand Hauger

👋 Halito!*

Welcome to Wednesday, where the first war crimes trial against a Russian soldier since Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine gets underway in Kyiv, Kim Jong-un slams North Korean officials’ response to the coronavirus outbreak and Mexico’s National Registry of Missing People reaches a grim milestone. Meanwhile, Ukrainian news outlet Livy Bereg looks at the rise of ethnic separatism across Russia’s federal regions.

[*Choctaw, Native American]

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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