When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Future

How Digital Technology Is Revolutionizing Art Exhibitions

Audiovisual spectacles like Imagine Van Gogh offer a completely new way to experience art. But as museums embrace digital tools, what does that mean for the physical work of art.

How Digital Technology Is Revolutionizing Art Exhibitions

At the Imagine Van Gogh Immersive Exhibition in Edmonton, Canada

Verónica Abdala

BUENOS AIRES — The Imagine Van Gogh event touring cities is an immersive art experience in which visitors walk through unusually large projections of the artist's works. Currently on show at the PROA Foundation, in Buenos Aires, it offers more than the reality of Van Gogh's paintings: viewers are constantly surprised by objects and works, including holograms, visual or sound effects, or projection mapping, which combine the real and virtual.

Screens, QR codes, mobile applications, augmented or virtual reality and holography are increasingly mixing with art and how it's displayed.


So far, this hasn't disrupted visiting habits or upset the public, as Imagine Van Gogh's sales figures have shown. In Buenos Aires, it sold 147,000 tickets before opening.

Museums are using digital tools to enrich the presentation of their contents

Imagine Van Gogh

A sensory experience

In a world and at a time when social media, streaming platforms and mass spectacles are stimulating our senses to excess, museums have turned to them to update their presentation format and language. It is a Darwinian leap meant to ensure survival and a creative response to changes imposed by technology.

Virtual visuals have thus reached a new paradigm: the institution of the museum and other spaces typically used to entertain. Museums are using digital tools to enrich the presentation of their contents, while spaces are using them to make visits a sensory experience beyond mere viewing.

But will it turn art into a show and detach exhibitions from physical works of art? And is that good or bad? These are debatable points, unlike the changes already underway. The future is now and inviting us to envisage the unpredictable. Curiosity, after all, is nothing but the intention and need to discover the unknown.


You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Ideas

"Collateral Benefit": Could Putin's Launching A Failed War Make The World Better?

Consider the inverse of "collateral damage." Envision Russia's defeat and the triumph of a democratic coalition offers reflection on the most weighty sense of costs and benefits.

Photo of a doll representing Russian President Vladimir Putin

Demonstrators holding a doll with a picture of Russian President Putin

Dominique Moïsi

-Analysis-

PARIS — The concept of collateral damage has developed in the course of so-called "asymmetrical” wars, fought between opponents considered unequal.

The U.S. drone which targeted rebel fighters in Afghanistan, and annihilated an entire family gathered for a wedding, appears to be the perfect example of collateral damage: a doubtful military gain, and a certain political cost. One might also consider the American bombing of Normandy towns around June 6, 1944 as collateral damage.

But is it possible to reverse the expression, and speak of "collateral benefits"? When applied to an armed conflict, the expression may seem shocking.

No one benefits from a war, which leaves in its trace a trail of dead, wounded and displaced people, destroyed cities or children brutally torn from their parents.

And yet the notion of "collateral benefits" is particularly applicable to the war that has been raging in Ukraine for almost a year.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest