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Dottoré!

A Sound Mind In A Sanitized Body?

Trying to put the "health" in "mental health" ...

Photo of a person using sanitizer

Applying the COVID protocol to mental health

Mariateresa Fichele

Now with COVID, everyone thinks they’re experts in antibodies — even my patients.

Dottoré, I've been taking drugs for 20 years because you say I'm sick, but couldn’t it be that maybe I'm cured, that now I have the antibodies, and you don't know?

"Gennà, unfortunately your disease is not caused by a virus, so you can't develop antibodies to fight it."


"But Dottoré, are you really sure?"

"Quite sure — that's where research stands at the moment."

"But could it be that one day, if they start looking for a virus as a cause for my disease, they might actually find one and also find a vaccine?"

"Why not! Maybe, who knows?"

"Then there’s hope, Dottoré! I am old, but for young people it could be a great thing! Three doses, you wash your hands well, use sanitizer, and you’re no longer schizophrenic!"


Learn more about Worldcrunch's exclusive Dottoré! series here.

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Society

Gun Violence In America: Don't Blame The Victims — That Means Rappers Too

The recent shooting of Takeoff, a rapper, is another sad incident of gun crime in the U.S. But those blaming hip hop culture for contributing to gun violence ignore that rappers themselves are also victims. And the real point is that in today's America, nobody is safe from gun violence.

Gun Violence In America: Don't Blame The Victims — That Means Rappers Too

Fans wait outside State Farm Arena in Atlanta to attend the memorial service for Migos rapper Takeoff on Nov. 11

A.D. Carson

Add the name of Takeoff, a member of the popular rap trio Migos, to the ever-growing list of rappers, recent and past, tragically and violently killed.

The initial reaction to the shooting to death of Takeoff, born Kirsnick Ball, on Nov. 1, was to blame rap music and hip hop culture. People who engaged in this kind of scapegoating argue that the violence and despairing hopelessness in the music are the cause of so many rappers dying.

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