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A burger and frites from Le Camion Qui Fume in Paris
A burger and frites from Le Camion Qui Fume in Paris
Mathilde Visseyrias

PARIS — At the Ritz palace overlooking the Place Vendôme, the "Ritz Burger" beaufort cheese, fries and a green salad is sold for 42 euros. At the Crillon bar, the chef's mini burgers are sampled until 6 pm, for a cool 28 euros. A longstanding symbol of junk food, the burger seems to have found its nobility: In just a decade, it has earned a seat at some of the most beautiful tables in France, including the Parisian address, Meurice, which The New York Times anointed as the maker of the world's best hamburger.

The burger, which first spread through the United States early last century, has prompted a revolution in the land of baguettes and foie gras: Sales last year exceeded those of the classic jambon-beurre (ham-and-butter) sandwich, a French staple. About 1.46 billion burgers were sold, 9% more than in 2016, according to Gira Conseil firm. Even if this tidal wave of burger sales is driven by an explosion in fast food sales, burgers are now also a must in traditional sit-down French restaurants. The dish is now featured on the menu at some 85% of 145,000 restaurants around the country, with owners opting for what is seen as both a "premium" and easy-to-eat offering.

The upscaling of the burger is linked to the arrival of food trucks in Paris.

The burger's rise in upper-end dining in France dates back to 2008, according to Maria Bertoch, a French restaurant specialist. In the face of the economic crisis, restaurant professionals saw this hearty dish as an opportunity to save money for themselves and their clientele. For Hubert Jan, president of the restaurant branch at Umih, the leading trade union of the profession, the upscaling of the burger in French cuisine can also be credited to food trucks that began to spread around Paris over the past five years, led by Le Camion Qui Fume ("The Smoking Truck"). "They have combined fast food and high quality," says Jan.

A burger at Moulin, a restaurant in France. — Photo: moulin

The burger is seen as a way to easily rejuvenate a restaurant's menu and customers, and goes down well for both lunch and dinner, with minimal preparation required. "Its margin is as high as that of a pizza or a crepe," one food professional says — between 10-15% more than any other dish à la carte on a sit-down menu, with ground meat being far less expensive than steak or rib.

Another advantage for restaurant owners is that adding a burger to the menu does not require investment: They can both diversify options and boost margins with a single dish. Pizza or crepes, for example, imply buying new specialized equipment. So, France, it seems, will keep firing up the grill like never before.

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Society

Jehovah's Witnesses Translate The Bible In Indigenous Language — Is This Colonialism?

The Jehovah's Witnesses in Chile have launched a Bible version translated into the native Mapudungun language, evidently indifferent to the concerns of a nation striving to save its identity from the Western cultural juggernaut.

A Mapuche family awaits for Chilean President Gabriel Boric to arrive at the traditional Te Deum in the Cathedral of Santiago, on Chile's Independence Day.

Claudia Andrade

NEUQUÉN — The Bible can now be read in Mapuzugun, the language of the Mapuche, an ancestral nation living across Chile and Argentina. It took the Chilean branch of the Jehovah's Witnesses, a latter-day Protestant church often associated with door-to-door proselytizing and cold calling, three years to translate it into "21st-century Mapuzugun".

The church's Mapuche members in Chile welcomed the book when it was launched in Santiago last June, but some of their brethren see it rather as a cultural imposition. The Mapuche were historically a fighting nation, and fiercely resisted both the Spanish conquerors and subsequent waves of European settlers. They are still fighting for land rights in Chile.

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