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food / travel

A German Butcher's Grosse Idea: Meat Smoothies

*Note: grosse (große) means great in German...

German butcher Peter Klassen presenting his meat drinks
German butcher Peter Klassen presenting his meat drinks
Stuart Richardson

Warning: It may look like a mixed-berry smoothie, or chocolate milkshake. But it's best to smell what's in the cup before drinking. A butcher in Temmels, Germany, has invented three chilled "meat drinks' for people who would like to ditch their coffee or detox shake for a protein-packed substitute.

Peter Klassen, 55, has spent the last three years developing recipes and one million euros of investment in the project. In an interview with the Berlin-based newspaper Die Welt, Klassen explained that his greatest difficulty in getting his meat smoothies on the market hasn't been a lack of public interest but rather finding a way to "make the meat so smooth that you can't feel any morsels on your tongue anymore." Ideally, the drinks' contents should be "as fine as cocoa."

A cut of the wellness market.

Meat smoothies aren't exactly a novel idea. A quick Google search renders millions of webpages and online videos dedicated to the drink. But Klassen is likely the first person to attempt to market the concoction commercially. With the help of his son and a chef, he has been able to liquify his meat, and is ready to sell his first three drinks: "Butcher Beef", "Beef Bombay", and "Poulet Royal," which will be available in Germany, Luxembourg, France, and Belgium.

Although Klassen understands that not everyone will be a fan of his drinks, he is confident that meat smoothies will carve out a place in the health and wellness market. He's also willing to put his money where his mouth is — or rather, his mouth where his money is. "I prefer eating meat at the table when I have the opportunity. But when I go workout, I drink a glass because it's not so heavy on the stomach."

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Geopolitics

The Trumpian Virus Undermining Democracy Is Now Spreading Through South America

Taking inspiration from events in the United States over the past four years, rejection of election results and established state institutions is on the rise in Latin America.

Two supporters of far-right Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro dressed in Brazilian flags during a demonstration in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Bolsonaro supporters dressed in national colours with flags in a demonstration in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on November 4, 2022.

Ivan Abreu / ZUMA
Carlos Ruckauf*

-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — South Africa's Nelson Mandela used to say it was "so easy to break down and destroy. The heroes are those who make peace and build."

Intolerance toward those who think differently, even inside the same political space, is corroding the bases of representative democracy, which is the only system we know that allows us to live and grow in freedom, in spite of its flaws.

Recent events in South America and elsewhere are precisely alerting us to that danger. The most explosive example was in Brazil, where a crowd of thousands managed to storm key institutional premises like the presidential palace, parliament and the Supreme Court.

In Peru, the country's Marxist (now former) president, Pedro Castillo, sought to use the armed and security forces to shut down parliament and halt the Supreme Court and state prosecutors from investigating corruption allegations against him.

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