Ideas

Nicaragua: Latin America's Left Betrays Its Own History By Excusing Ortega

Leftist states defending rigged elections to be held Nov. 7 in Nicaragua are not so much protecting regional socialism as approving despotism itself, which they too were victims of...

-OpEd-

BUENOS AIRES — Four days before Christmas 2020, Nicaragua's parliament, which follows the dictates of the country's ruling couple, Daniel Ortega and Rosario Murillo, passed a law to effectively outlaw their political rivals. Barely two paragraphs long, the pernicious and pompously named Law to Defend the People's Rights to Independence, Sovereignty and Self-Determination for Peace, lumped the entire opposition into the category of "traitors to the fatherland."

It ruled that anyone the government considers terrorists and "plotters" could no longer seek elected office. It also provided a pretext for the arrests in the subsequent months of the main opposition aspirants for presidential elections, now set for November 7.

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We Once Cheered Ortega: Revisiting History In Nicaragua

None should be more dismayed by Daniel Ortega's despotic slide than those who hailed his revolution as a triumph of democratic socialism, some 40 years ago.

-Analysis-

BOGOTÁThirty-nine years ago, on July 19, 1979, those of us who were young were busy celebrating a historical event: the entry of rebel Sandinista forces into Managua, Nicaragua"s capital, after the overthrow of dictator Anastasio Somoza.

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Nicaraguan Regime Crackdown Is A Humanitarian Emergency

Police and pro-government paramilitaries have killed more than 200 people — including a 14-month-old boy — since a wave of anti-Ortega protests began in mid April.

-Editorial-

BOGOTA —The Daniel Ortega regime in Nicaragua is continuing its bloodbath against the opposition. So far, at least 212 have been killed since protests against the government began two months ago, according to a report by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR), which sent a team to Managua this week in a desperate bid to curb the violence and renew dialogue between the sides.

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Latin American Elections, A Mirror Of Global Unrest In 2018

Governments in several Latin American states are facing angry voters who may remove them from power, but perhaps of greater concern is the spreading wrath against all politicians, everywhere.

BUENOS AIRES — Another big crisis has erupted in Latin America. Nicaragua. This erstwhile member of the declining forces of so-called 21st Century Socialism is in fact the other facet of the Venezuelan experience.

The Sandinista government controls the armed forces and police, and it has had a relatively successful run given Nicaragua's size and impoverished state. The regime had forged a firm alliance with the private sector and revamped its Marxism with a mix of zealous Christianity.

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Nicaragua
Benjamin Witte

Nicaragua, A Death Toll And Daniel Ortega's Destiny

-Analysis-

Nicaragua's crafty caudillo, Daniel Ortega, has weathered the storm — for now at least. But his grip on power is certainly not what it was before the dramatic developments of the past two weeks.

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Nicaragua
Giacomo Tognini

Nicaraguan Indigenous: Biosphere Reserve Is Our 'Lungs'

Indigenous groups say the Nicaraguan government should do more to protect the massive but quickly disappearing Bosawás Biosphere Reserve.

MATAGALPA — The 20,000-square-kilometer Bosawás Biosphere Reserve in northern Nicaragua is as biologically rich as it is expansive, covering about 15% of the national territory. It is also home to various indigenous communities. And yet — despite its designation in 1991 as a UNESCO World Heritage site — the largely unexplored jungle area is under serious threat from illegal settlement and logging, the Nicaraguan daily El Nuevo Diario reports.

The government estimates that there are at least 34,000 settlers squatting on indigenous and protected land within the reserve. To address the problem, it launched a so-called "Action Plan" five years ago that combines tighter security and stronger environmental standards within the reserve and economic development of nearby areas. Army operations have targeted timber traffickers and illegal land dealers in the area.

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Nicaragua
Benjamin Witte

Ortega And Maduro, Burdens Of A Shared Destiny

Just hours before outgoing U.S. President Barack Obama's emotional farewell address in Chicago, another head of state was taking center stage down in steamy Central America to let just the opposite be known: He's still very much here, with no plans to leave power anytime soon.

Daniel Ortega, the long-serving leader of Nicaragua, first came to power through a 1979 revolution that overthrew the U.S.-backed Somoza family dictatorship. He headed the country's junta government (1979-1985) before serving as president until 1990. Two more terms followed, starting in 2007, and on Tuesday, Ortega was sworn in for yet another five-year period, the Nicaraguan daily El Nuevo Diario reported.

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Nicaragua

Ortega Ambitions, Nicaragua’s First Couple Edges Toward 'Dynastic Rule'

Nicaragua's once revolutionary president Daniel Ortega has won reelection, this time with his wife Rosario Murillo as VP. It's an accumulation of power and money that makies their own supporters squirm.

-Editorial-

Daniel Ortega's victory in Nicaragua's presidential elections last Sunday, with more than 70% of votes cast in his favor, has brought the former guerrilla leader one step closer to installing a dynastic regime.

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Nicaragua

Nicaragua's Ortega: From Egalitarian Ideals To Boundless Ambition

As President Daniel Ortega and his relatives continue to accumulate power in Nicaragua, they are becoming a close copy of the venal political dynasty Ortega fought to overthrow.

-Editorial-

BOGOTÁ — It is paradoxical, to say the least, that the former guerrilla chief who fought to topple a dictatorship in Nicaragua should now become a bit of a dictator himself. Critics are saying that Nicaragua's President Daniel Ortega is gradually taking control of, well, everything in the country , much like the Somozas, members of the patrician family that ran Nicaragua practically as a fiefdom in the 1960s and 70s.

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Nicaragua
Roberto Giovannini

A Dubious Chinese Link To The Grand Nicaragua Canal

Groundbreaking on the much heralded Central American project is said to be imminent. But huge doubts linger, including the bankrolling of the project by a mysterious Chinese businessman.

MANAGUA — If it actually gets built, the Interoceanic Grand Canal — which would stretch for 278 kilometers between Venado on Nicaragua's Atlantic coast to Puerto Brito on the country's Pacific side — would be the most impressive work of infrastructure in the world.

This gigantic ship canal would be larger than Panama's — 30 meters deep, ranging from 230 to 520 meters wide, and splitting Nicaragua in two. It would pass mountains and go through rivers, and use the great Cocibolca Lake, the largest body of fresh water in Central America, to shorten its course.

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Nicaragua
Daniel Salgar

An '80s Flashback? Russia's New Military Presence In Nicaragua

Faced with Colombia's military strength and apparent resolve not to hand over a disputed swathe of the Caribbean, Nicaragua is inviting friendly Russia into the area.

BOGOTA — Since the International Court at The Hague issued its November 2012 ruling that delineated the new maritime frontier between Nicaragua and Colombia, the longstanding dispute between the Caribbean neighbors has festered into a diplomatic impasse that is increasingly taking on a military tenor.

The Nicaraguans have announced that in 2014 they will allow U.S. and Russian military forces to enter the section of the Caribbean that the Hague Court gave them — which Colombia has so far refused to abandon or hand over. Nicaragua has said the forces would participate in joint counter-narcotics operations, but Colombia is increasingly on edge about other actions Nicaragua may have planned with the two large foreign powers.

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Nicaragua

Nicaragua’s Sex Abuse “Epidemic”

LA PRENSA (Nicaragua)

MANAGUA – A leading women's rights organization is calling on Nicaraguan authorities to declare a "yellow alert" over the country's growing sexual abuse "epidemic," La Prensa reports.

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Nicaragua

Daniel Ortega: Latin America’s Ho Chi Minh?

EL DIARIO NUEVO (Nicaragua)

MANAGUA - Is Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega the "Ho Chi Minh of Latin America?"

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Nicaragua
Jean-Michel Caroit

Flush With Chávez Petro-Dollars, Nicaragua’s Ortega Eyes Controversial Third Term

Economic growth and discretionary funds funneled from Venezuelan leader Hugo Chávez have helped position Nicaragua leader Daniel Ortega as the frontrunner for Sunday’s presidential election. Critics say Ortega is defying term limits and building a corrupt

MANAGUA -- Covered in jewels and wrapped in brightly-colored fabrics, Rosario Murillo seems like some grand priestess at a religious ceremony. "Thanks to God and to our president, Commander Daniel, the Nicaraguan family lives in peace, with ever more Christianity, socialism and solidarity," says Murillo.

Sitting next to her is a serene Daniel Ortega, Murillo's husband and the president of the country. Next to him is Miguel Obando, the 85-year-old Cardinal who, three decades ago – during the early days of the Sandinista revolution – was an adversary of Ortega. The Church leader now faithfully supports the president.

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