When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

EL ESPECTADOR

What Voters Read In A Candidate's Face

Researchers used visuals and scanning technology to gauge how people 'feel' about the contenders in Colombia's current presidential election.

Current Colombian President Santos
Current Colombian President Santos
Germán Gómez Polo

BOGOTÁ — Can voters be swayed by a candidate's face? If they're young and undecided, then yes, researchers in Colombia have found.

Psychologist Henry Castillo Parram, in collaboration with the firm Neuromind, selected 180 eligible voters from Bogotá and Medellín, all aged 18-24, and showed them pictures of the five main candidates for the country's recent first-round of presidential election, on May 27.

The candidates include leftist former mayor of Bogotá Gustavo Petro, Humberto de la Calle, a veteran official who led peace talks with the FARC guerrillas, former Medellín mayor Sergio Fajardo, and the centrist Germán Vargas Lleras. (By Monday, the election appeared set for a tight run-off next month in the race to succeed departing President Juan Manuel Santos.)

Researchers showed a random selection of images of the candidates — in mosaics, black and white, or color — and used eye tracking and face reading technologies to scan the subjects' reactions.

"The human brain is sensitive to human faces," says Castillo. "It is genetically coded for that. So when people have not yet defined their vote and do not know about proposals, they rely on biological and automatic criteria caught by the brain." Facial symmetry, he adds, generates hormones that can prompt "emotional attachment."

It is genetically coded for that.

The scans identified seven feelings among respondents: happiness, sadness, wrath, surprise, fear, distaste and contempt. Fajardo, who worked as mayor to make Medellín more user-friendly, generated a 23.7 happiness score out of 100 (compared to 7.9 for Vargas Lleras). Fajardo also scored well in terms of generating trust, with 25/100.

The subjects found de la Calle to be the most "depressing" of the candidates, with a 43.4 sadness score, and Petro the least. A no-nonsense socialist, Petro is doing well in polls in spite of his troubled spell as mayor.

Humberto de la Calle — Photo: El Espectador

The "establishment" candidates Vargas Lleras and de la Calle fared worst over all in the facial tracking study. "Vargas Lleras earned the most negative scores from the emotional aspect," says Castillo. Both candidates, he adds, failed to "activate the neurons' of the young would-be voters.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

eyes on the U.S.

Eyes On U.S. — California, The World Is Worried About You

As an Italian bestseller explores why people are fleeing the Golden State, the international press also takes stock of unprecedented Silicon Valley layoffs. It may be a warning for the rest of the world.

Photo of a window pane with water droplets reflecting Facebook's thumb up logo, with one big thumb down in the background

Are you OK, Meta?

Ginevra Falciani and Bertrand Hauger

-Analysis-

For as long as we can remember, the world has seen California as the embodiment of the American Dream.

Today, this dream may be fading — and the world is taking notice.

A peek at the Italian list of non-fiction best-sellers in 2022 includes California by Francesco Costa, a book that looks to explain why 340,000 people moved out of the state last year, causing a drop in its population for the first time ever.

To receive Eyes on U.S. each week in your inbox, sign up here.

Why are all these people leaving a state that on paper looks like the best place in the world to live? Why are stickers with the phrase “Don't California my Texas” attached to the back of so many pick-up trucks?

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest