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Bulgarians celebrated its National Day, which marked the 143rd anniversary of the country’s liberation from five centuries of Ottoman rule
Bulgarians celebrated its National Day, which marked the 143rd anniversary of the country’s liberation from five centuries of Ottoman rule

Welcome to Thursday, where the Myanmar crackdown toll multiplies, a Swedish axe attack injures eight and someone's finally looking out for the platypus. We also feature Le Monde"s investigation of rampant sexism in France's finest culinary schools.

• COVID-19 latest: Indian Bharat Biotech's COVAXIN shows 81% efficacy. In Germany Chancellor Angela Merkel reveals a five-step plan for easing restrictions, while France lifts its ban on AstraZeneca vaccine to be given to 65+. Police in China and South Africa seize thousands of counterfeit Covid vaccines. And a new report shows that mortality rates are higher in countries where more people are obese.

• Myanmar coup: The United Nations reports at least 38 people were killed yesterday in the deadliest day since coup began.

• U.S. Police uncover ‘possible plot" by militia: Nearly two months after the insurrection, Capitol police uncover intelligence on a possible plot to breach the U.S. Capitol today. The threat appears to be connected to a QAnon conspiracy theory that Trump will rise again to power on March 4.

• Sweden attack: A man in the southern Swedish city of Vetlanda injured eight people in an axe attack that police are investigating as a possible terrorist act.

• South Korean transgender soldier found dead: South Korea's first transgender soldier, Byun Hui-su, has been found dead at home after being forcibly ousted from the military. The cause of death is unknown and authorities said she had been dead for a few days.

• SpaceX prototype lands, explodes: After two previous attempts that exploded mid-air, Elon Musk's SpaceX Mars prototype SN10 rocket landed successfully in Texas. The craft, however, blew up only minutes later.

• Platypus refuge: In light of recent droughts and wildfires which have devastated the animal's habitat, an Australian zoo will set up the world's first platypus sanctuary.

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Ideas

García Márquez And Truth: How Journalism Fed The Novelist's Fantasy

In his early journalistic writings, the Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez showed he had an eye for factual details, in which he found the absurdity and 'magic' that would in time be the stuff and style of his fiction.

Colombian novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez reads his book

J. D. Torres Duarte

BOGOTÁ — In short stories written in the 1940s and early 50s and later compiled in Eyes of a Blue Dog, the late Gabriel García Márquez, Colombia's Nobel Prize-winning novelist, shows he is as yet a young writer, with a style and subjects that can be atypical.

Stylistically, García Márquez came into his own in the celebrated One Hundred Years of Solitude. Until then both his style and substance took an erratic course: touching the brevity of film scripts in Nobody Writes to the Colonel, technical experimentation in Leaf Storm, the anecdotal short novel in In Evil Hour or exploring politics in Big Mama's Funeral. Throughout, the skills he displayed were rather of a precocious juggler.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

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