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Rubble at al-Shati refugee camp after Israeli airstrikes hit Gaza
Rubble at al-Shati refugee camp after Israeli airstrikes hit Gaza

Welcome to Tuesday, where deadly warfare erupts in Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the Indian COVID variant is "cause for concern," and NASA gets its hands on some seriously old space dust. Le Monde"s Joan Tilouine also explains how the initial excitement surrounding Beijing's so-called "Stadium Diplomacy" in Africa has turned.

• Israel responds to Palestinian rockets with deadly Gaza airstrikes: Palestinian militants fired rockets towards Israel, and Israel retaliated with airstrikes in Gaza earlier today, following confrontations at al-Asqa Mosque in Jerusalem on Monday. Palestinian authorities say at least 24 people were killed, including nine children in the most violent outbreak in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict since 2019.

• Deadly Russian school shooting: At least 11 people were killed and dozens wounded after one or several men opened fire in a school in Kazan, eastern Russia.

• Indian variant of COVID of "global concern" amid new surge across Asia: The World Health Organization has warned that the coronavirus variant first found in India was of "global concern". The Indian variant has been found in at least 30 other countries so far. Malaysia imposed a new nationwide lockdown on Monday, and the fourth wave hitting Japan has sparked criticism and calls for tougher restrictions ahead of the Summer Olympics in Tokyo.

• Myanmar journalists, activists arrested in Thailand: Three reporters and two activists from Myanmar have been arrested in Thailand for illegally entering the country, and could possibly face deportation. Dozens of journalists have been arrested and many news agencies have been banned since the Feb. 1 military coup.

• U.S. fires warning shots at Iranian ships at Strait of Hormuz: The Pentagon confirmed that the U.S Coast Guard fired two warning shots at a fleet of 13 Iranian boats that came too close to American naval vessels in the Persian Gulf's Strait of Hormuz on Monday.

• Golden Globes boycott: Following criticisms about the lack of diversity in the Golden Globes, the NBC television network announced it will not air the event next year, while actor Tom Cruise handed back his three awards.

• NASA craft returning home with 5-billion-year-old asteroid dust: A NASA spacecraft containing a sample of rock and dirt as old as the Solar System will drop from outer space into the Utah desert in two years time, and is likely to provide clues on how the Solar System was formed.

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Coronavirus

In Shanghai, A Brewing Expat Exodus As COVID Crackdown Shows "Real" China

Not only strict rules of freedom of movement as part of Zero-COVID policy but also an increase in censorship has raised many questions for the expat population in the megacity of 26 million that had long enjoyed a kind of special status in China as a place of freedom and openness. A recent survey of foreigners in the Chinese megacity found that 48% of respondents said they would leave Shanghai within the next year.

People walk in Tianzifang, located in Huangpu District, a well-known tourist attraction in Shanghai.

Lili Bai

SHANGHAI — On the seventh day of the lockdown, Félix, a French expat who has worked in Shanghai for four years, texted his boss: I want to "run,' mais je sais pas quand (but I don’t know when). A minute later, he received a reply: moi aussi (me too).

Félix had recently learned the new Mandarin word 润 (run) from social network postings of his local friends. Because its pinyin “rùn” is the same as the English word “run,” Chinese youth had begun to use it to express their wish to escape reality, either to “be freed from mundane life”, or to “run toward your future.”

For foreigners like Félix, by associating the expression “run” with the feeling of the current lockdown in Shanghai, “everything makes sense.” Félix recalled how at the end of March, the government denied rumors of an impending lockdown: “My Chinese colleagues all said, Shanghai is China’s top city, there would be no lockdown no matter what.”

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