When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Passersby take pictures of cherry blossoms in a park in Tokyo, Japan, where the sakura season has begun.
Passersby take pictures of cherry blossoms in a park in Tokyo, Japan, where the sakura season has begun.

Welcome to Tuesday, where a lone gunman kills 10 in Colorado, Israel votes (again!) and a tweet is worth $2.9 million. Italian weekly L'Espresso also helps us sort through the damage from the tons of trash Italian waste traffickers are dumping in the neighboring Balkans.

• Another Colorado mass shooting: A lone suspect has been arrested after the second U.S. mass shooting in a week, when 10 people were killed at a grocery store in Boulder, Colorado. The state of Colorado has been the site of some of the worst such tragedies in the past two decades, beginning with the 1999 shooting at Columbine High School.

• Vaccine stumbles: The AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine may have used "outdated information" in trials, meaning that efficacy data could be incomplete. Meanwhile, Slovakia's deal to obtain the Sputnik V vaccine has sparked a possible government crisis, as the EU has not approved the Russian-made vaccine.

• Israel national elections: Israel heads to the polls for the fourth time in two years, as embattled longtime Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu hopes for a boost linked to the success of the country's vaccine rollout.

• EU sanctions China: For the first time in 30 years, the EU has agreed to sanction China for human rights abuses. China strikes back with sanctions on ten European individuals and four entities.

• Saudi Arabia-Yemen peace deal: Saudi Arabia has offered a ceasefire and the reopening of airports and seaports with Yemen.

• Bangladesh refugee camp fire: At least 15 are dead and another 400 missing after a fire breaks out in the Rohingya camp in Cox's Bazar. Roughly 50,000 people were forced to flee.

• Brick by space brick: To celebrate 40 years since the first Space Shuttle launch, Danish toy manufacturer Lego has unveiled its new 2,354-piece Space Shuttle Discovery set.

Keep reading... Show less
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Economy

The Bogus Concept Of "Carbon-Neutral" Oil

The Colombian president recently said that the country had exported one million barrels of carbon-neutral or offset oil. But in an unregulated carbon market, such a claim is pure greenwashing.

People walk in the streets of Bogotá

María Mónica Monsalve Sánchez

-OpEd-

BOGOTÁ - In March this year, various national and corporate leaders met in Houston, Texas, for CERAWeek, an annual conference to discuss the world's energy challenges. Colombia's President Iván Duque took the opportunity to remind participants that his country produced just 0.6% of the world's carbon emissions even as it had raised crude production to one million barrels a day.

He said oil should not be seen as an enemy, since the fight was really against greenhouse gas emissions. He also revealed at the event that the country's national oil firm, Ecopetrol, had sold the Asian market its first million barrels of carbon-neutral or offset crude, consisting of the entire extraction, production and exportation chain.

Keep reading... Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch Video Show less
MOST READ