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Geopolitics

Race Protests In U.S. — 26 Front Pages From Around The World

Protests in New York City
Protests in New York City

After more than two months headlines around the world focused on a single topic — COVID-19 — collective attention has turned to another story: the death of an unarmed black man George Floyd at the hands of four police officers in the American city of Minneapolis on May 25th, and the violent protests that followed in cities across the country, as U.S. President Donald Trump seemed to encourage more violence. Protests have been escalating for a week, with chaotic scenes of riots and buildings set on fire now everywhere on newspapers front pages from around the world:

USA

Star Tribune

The Wall Street Journal

The New York Times

The Washington Post


CANADA

The Globe and Mail

The Toronto Star


CUBA

Granma


BRAZIL

Folha de Sao Paulo


COLOMBIA


ARGENTINA

La Nacion


FRANCE

Libération

La Croix


UNITED KINGDOM

The Independent


SPAIN

La Razon

La Vanguardia


GERMANY

Die Tageszeitung


AUSTRIA

Kleine Zeitung


NETHERLANDS

De Volkskrant


DENMARK

Politiken


SWEDEN

Dagens Nyheter


SLOVAKIA

Dennik N


CROATIA

Vecernji list


ISRAEL

Haaretz


SOUTH KOREA

The Chosun Ilbo


AUSTRALIA

The Daily Telegraph


NEW ZEALAND

The Dominion Post

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LGBTQ Plus

Mayan And Out! Living Proudly As An Indigenous Gay Man

Being gay and indigenous can mean facing double discrimination, including from within the communities they belong to. But LGBTQ+ indigenous people in Guatemala are liberating their sexuality and reclaiming their cultural heritage.

Photo of the March of Dignity in Guatemala

The March of Dignity in Guatemala

Teresa Son and Emma Gómez

CANTEL — Enrique Salanic and Arcadio Salanic are two K'iché Mayan gay men from this western Guatemalan city

Fire is a powerful symbol for them. Associated with the sons and daughters of Tohil, the god who bestows fire in Mayan culture, it becomes the mirror and the passage that allows them to see and express their sexuality. It is a portal that connects people with their grandmothers and grandfathers, the cosmos and the energies that the earth transmits.

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