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Las Vegas, Worst Mass Shooting In U.S. History

Police cars near the site of Las Vegas shooting on Oct. 2
Police cars near the site of Las Vegas shooting on Oct. 2

Las Vegas Review-Journal, Oct. 2, 2017

"Mass shooting on Strip," reads the front page of the Las Vegas Review-Journal, just hours after a man opened fire on a crowd of an open-air country music festival in Las Vegas.

At least 50 people were killed and 406 people transported to hospitals according to the latest report published by the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department.

The gunman, identified as a 64-year-old local resident named Stephen Paddock, was on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel when he opened fire on the crowd of approximately 22,000 concert-goers. He was later found dead in his room. Las Vegas undersheriff Kevin McMahill said it is unclear if the gunman, whose motives are as of yet unknown, shot himself or was killed by the police.

With the rising death toll, the attack is now the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history, surpassing the shooting at a nightclub in Orlando, Florida on June 12, 2016.

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Society

Star Trek And The Journey From Science Fiction To Pseudoscience

Fans of Star Trek live in a Golden Age where old and new series are readily available. As one hardcore Trekkie points out, the franchise is a reminder of the similarities and differences between pseudoscience and science fiction.

Image of holographic bodies standing next to each other in an office

Holographic figures of the same person standing beside each other.

Carlos Orsi

-Essay-

For my Trekkie part, I'm still a fan of the old ones: I still remember the disappointment when a Brazilian TV channel stopped airing the original series, and then there was a wait (sometimes years) until someone else decided to show it.

Living deep in São Paulo, Brazil in the 1990s, it was also torturous for me when “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” premiered on a station whose signal was very bad in my city.

I don't remember when I saw the original cast for the first time, but I remember that when Star Trek made the transition to the cinema in 1979, in Robert Wise's film, the protagonists James Kirk (William Shatner), Spock (Leonard Nimoy), Leonard McCoy (DeForest Kelley), Montgomery Scott (James Doohan) and the Starship Enterprise were already old acquaintances.

And I was only eight years old. Nowadays, given the scarcity of time and attention that are the hallmarks of the contemporary world, I limit myself to following spinoffs Picard and Strange New Worlds and reviewing films made for cinema, from time to time.

So, when a cinema close to my house decided to show the 40th anniversary of The Wrath of Khan (originally released in 1982), I rushed to secure a ticket. And there in the middle of the film, I had a small epiphany: the Star Trek Universe is pseudoscientific!

This realization does not necessarily represent a problem: contrary to what many imagine, science fiction exists to make you think and have fun, not to prepare for a national test).

Yet in a franchise that has always made a lot of effort to maintain an aura of scientific bona fides (Isaac Asimov was a consultant on the first film, and the book The Physics of Star Trek has a preface by Stephen Hawking!), the finding was a bit of a shock.

And what made me jump out of the chair?

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