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Geopolitics

Hawaii To Holland, Populism Bumps In The Road

Phony Gert gelt...
Phony Gert gelt...

The headlines this morning provide two bits of far-flung hope for those still shaken by Brexit and Donald Trump: the new version of Trump's travel ban applied to six majority-Muslim countries was blocked by a judge in Hawaii; meanwhile, halfway across the world, Geert Wilders' far-right party suffered surprisingly disappointing results in Dutch parliamentary elections.

But the winds of populism and anti-immigrant fervor are far from quiet. The U.S. ban will likely be back again, under one form or another, with ultimate limits on the power of the judicial branch to stave off popular sentiment. Indeed, Wilders' falling short of the top vote count may just be a bump in the road on the way to eventually taking power.

Rutte celebrates victory, for now at least.

From the point of view of Wilders' PVV party, winning five additional seats in a hotly disputed election with a turnout at a 30-year high, and becoming the country's second-biggest party, can simply not be considered failure. Wilder told ITV that his party had "put its mark on the elections' and that its "influence grew every day." Critics had indeed already observed a shift to the right in the latest policies and stances of Prime Minister Mark Rutte, whose liberal VVD party remains the largest party despite losing 8 seats.

The recent diplomatic row with Turkey seems to have benefited Rutte more than Wilders, as it allowed the PM to take a tough stance against a Muslim leader in a campaign that's been dominated by anger at immigration and integration. Now that the campaign is over, Dutch media believe Rutte faces an uphill battle to form a coalition government, especially after the historic defeat of his former coalition partner, the Labour Party, which lost 29 of its 38 seats in Parliament.

In a tweet, Washington Post columnist Charles Lane noted that "maybe we're all missing the real story in European politics which is not the rise of the populist right but the fall of Social-Democratic left." That's true in the Netherlands, for now. But the next big political test, in France starting on April 23, might prove that the two phenomenon are two sides of the same coin. For now, at least, those coins are still counted in euros.

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Society

Parenthood And The Pressure Of Always Having To Be Doing Better

As a father myself, I'm now better able to understand the pressures my own dad faced. It's helped me face my own internal demands to constantly be more productive and do better.

Photo of a father with a son on his shoulders

Father and son in the streets of Madrid, Spain

Ignacio Pereyra*

-Essay-

When I was a child — I must have been around eight or so — whenever we headed with my mom and grandma to my aunt's country house in Don Torcuato, outside of Buenos Aires, there was the joy of summer plans. Spending the day outdoors, playing soccer in the field, being in the swimming pool and eating delicious food.

But when I focus on the moment, something like a painful thorn appears in the background: from the back window of the car I see my dad standing on the sidewalk waving us goodbye. Sometimes he would stay at home. “I have to work” was the line he used.

Maybe one of my older siblings would also stay behind with him, but I'm sure there were no children left around because we were all enthusiastic about going to my aunt’s. For a long time in his life, for my old man, those summer days must have been the closest he came to being alone, in silence (which he liked so much) and in calm, considering that he was the father of seven. But I can only see this and say it out loud today.

Over the years, the scene repeated itself: the destination changed — it could be a birthday or a family reunion. The thorn was no longer invisible but began to be uncomfortable as, being older, my interpretation of the events changed. When words were absent, I started to guess what might be happening — and we know how random guessing can be.

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