el correo gernika gernica

El Correo, April 26, 2017

The front page speaks for itself. "Guernika," Wednesday's edition of Spain's El Correo reads, with the Basque spelling of Guernica displayed in bold red letters against a black background. And just below "26.4.1937" — a date that will forever be linked to the Basque Country town and the horrific part it played, 80 years ago today, in Spain's devastating civil war.

Guernica was bustling when, starting at about 4:30 p.m., the first planes appeared from the west, the Bilbao-based daily recalls. Then, the unthinkable began: In wave after wave, for more than two hours, the planes mercilessly bombed and strafed the town, killing hundreds of innocent men, women and children.

"It was the first systematic bombing in history of a civilian population," the article reads. "Things had been heard about the atrocities that the Italians had committed from the air in Abisinia Ethiopia, but this far exceeded any known disaster."

Spanish-born artist Pablo Picasso famously depicted the Guernica massacre in expressionist scenes of mangled death and destruction.

The planes turned out to be German, operating in service of Spain's rebel army, which was bent on punishing the Basque leadership for its continuing support of the Spanish Republic. Years later, the attack would be seen in an even more sinister light, as a precursor — a trial run of sorts — for the horrors Adolf Hitler and his Nazi war machine would impose on so many other parts of Europe.

Up to that point, people thought Francisco Franco, the rebel leader and future dictator of Spain, wouldn't dare attack Guernica — "because of its symbolism for the Basque people," El Correo explains. "Nothing could have been further from the truth. Today, Guernica mourns a tragedy and ignominy that is without precedent in the history of humanity."

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!

Mariam Nabattu, a religious studies teacher, must work at two schools in central Uganda to make ends meet.

Patricia Lindrio/GPJ Uganda
Edna Namara and Patricia Lindrio

KAMPALA — Allen Asimwe has dedicated more than two decades to teaching geography at a large public high school in southwestern Uganda. Her retirement age, as a public servant entitled to benefits, is just six years away.

She doubts she will wait that long.

“I am determined, I want to quit,” she says, calculating that she could earn more by shifting full time to the salon she opened six years ago to supplement her income. “Given the frustration, I cannot continue in class anymore.”

Keep reading... Show less
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS
MOST READ