When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

European Elections: EU's Latinos Launch Political Movement

Spaniards born of Latin American families are running for the first time in the European Parliament elections. They have a unique agenda.

MIEL movement Jose Cordeiro with EU-Venezuelan supporters
MIEL movement Jose Cordeiro with EU-Venezuelan supporters
Héctor Casanueva

-Analysis-

MADRID — A new movement of Latin Americans has emerged in Spain ahead of the EU parliamentary elections, to be held this month. The Independent Euro Latino Movement, or MIEL ("Movimiento Independiente Euro Latino"), is made up of Latin Americans with double citizenship or residing in Europe and it seeks to represent more than 2.5 million Spanish Latin Americans or Latin American Spaniards with the right to vote. They have 52 candidates for the EU parliamentary elections.

The movement will add diversity to the intense debate on the future of Europe at a crucial moment for Spain and the European Union. Spain's emerging European Latinos or Latin Europeans want to keep their identities and original cultures, while becoming more involved within Europe, contributing work and ideas. The movement is also seen as a way of helping Latin America from the EU.

The idea is to reach Brussels to strengthen cooperation with Latin America, and defend the rights of Spanish and European Latinos within the EU. The list of candidates is multicultural and includes Venezuelans, Ecuadorians, Colombians, Peruvians, Cubans, Bolivians, Dominicans and Spaniards.

It is a new coalition and is yet to become familiar to Spanish Latino voters.

The movement will put forward proposals regarding specific concerns of European Latinos, like visas for the Schengen zone, migratory restrictions for relatives and family members, detention in migrant centers, remittances or recognition of university and professional qualifications.

The movement's founder is José Luis Cordeiro, a Spanish-Venezuelan engineer and graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has written several books on the economy and technology, and is particularly known for contributions in the fields of AI and new technologies. His proposals include seeking research and development funds for a European Anti-Aging Agency. Cordeiro favors boosting EU-Latin American cooperation in nanotechnology, biotechnology and academic exchanges beyond the existing EU-Latin America and Caribbean pact in the sector.

The group's success in the coming EU elections remains to be seen, since it is a new coalition and is yet to become familiar to Spanish Latino voters. The EU election campaign is very brief and coincides with elections for municipal districts and autonomous or regional communities. There are signs however that the new Latin Europeans might win the 300,000 votes needed in these polls. In any case, their emergence is remarkable, and there is no reason why the movement should not mature and become a permanent fixture of EU politics in the future.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!

Members of the search and rescue team from Miami search the rubble for missing persons at Fort Myers Beach, after Florida was hit by Hurricane Ian.

Sophia Constantino, Laure Gautherin, Anne-Sophie Goninet

👋 Shlamaloukh!*

Welcome to Tuesday, where North Korea reportedly fires a missile over Japan for the first time in five years, Ukrainian President Zelensky signs a decree vowing to never negotiate with Russia while Putin is in power, and a lottery win raises eyebrows in the Philippines. Meanwhile, Argentine daily Clarin looks at how the translation of a Bible in an indigenous language in Chile has sparked a debate over the links between language, colonialism and cultural imposition.

[*Assyrian, Syria]

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ