When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Enjoy unlimited access to quality journalism.

Limited time offer

Get your 30-day free trial!

AL AHRAM (Egypt), BBC (UK)

Worldcrunch

CAIRO – As the calm reigns over Tahrir square, cyber activists are multiplying their calls for Tuesday’s protests that will start at 4 P.M. in Cairo and later in other cities, according to tweets under the hashtag #Tuesday’s_mobilization.

[rebelmouse-image 27086098 alt="""" original_size="499x333" expand=1]

Protesters in front of the presidential palace. Photo Gigi Ibrahim

Al Ahram newspaper announced that two protests are expected on Tuesday: pro-Morsi supporters who will demonstrate in front of the headquarters of the Muslim Brotherhood in the Mokkatam suburb, southeast of Cairo, and anti-Morsi protestors who will demonstrate in Tahrir square and around the presidential palace against the constitutional referendum.

It is now confirmed that the referendum will take place next Saturday. On Monday night, the State Council announced that judges had finally agreed to supervise the voting process. However, their acceptance is under five conditions, according to Al Ahram: providing protection for voting offices, banning any electoral publicity outside voting offices, protecting the lives of judges who will supervise the referendum, protecting the headquarters of the high commission of referendum supervision and putting an end to the siege around the Constitutional Court.

At least nine people were hurt early on Tuesday when petrol bombs were thrown and shots fired at opposition demonstrators camping in Tahrir Square, reports the BBC. The attackers have yet to be identified.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Economy

Post-Pandemic Reflections On The Accumulation Of State Power

The public sector has seen a revival in response to COVID-19. This can be a good thing, but must be checked carefully because history tells us of the risks of too much control in the government's hands.

photo of 2 nurses in india walking past graffiti that says "democracy'

Medical students protesting at Calcutta Medical Collage and Hospital.

Sudipta Das/Pacific Press via ZUMA
Vibhav Mariwala

-Analysis-

NEW DELHI — The COVID-19 pandemic marked the beginning of a period of heightened global tensions, social and economic upheaval and of a sustained increase in state intervention in the economy. Consequently, the state has acquired significant powers in managing people’s personal lives, starting from lockdowns and quarantine measures, to providing stimulus and furlough schemes, and now, the regulation of energy consumption.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest