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Iranian Woman Seeks Divorce Because Husband Is Too Generous

Too generous...with others.

Iranian Woman Seeks Divorce Because Husband Is Too Generous

During a recent family court appearance in Tehran, an Iranian woman requested that a judge certify an end to her three-year marriage on grounds that her husband is … too nice.

"He has passed the limits of kindness," the newspaper Jam-e Jam quoted the woman, Razieh, as saying.

The problem, more specifically, has to do with the husband's habit of giving out money. "We've often had financial problems, and yet he's been lending money to friends and acquaintances," Razieh reportedly said of her husband, Jahan.

"He just wants to make me suffer," she added. "He hasn't learned about responsibility in a marriage."

Jahan, in his defense, told the judge he had lent money "to just a few people." He said that Razieh had blown the issue out of proportion. "I feel she's jealous."

The husband claimed his wife flew into a rage upon finding out he had lent money to one of her friends, though it was not immediately clear if this was a man or woman.

Either way, Jahan said he would not oppose a divorce, as "she just wants me as her servant."

The judge asked the couple to reconsider, but they refused. He then instructed the bickering partners to attend a couple counseling session. Divorce is permitted under Iran's Islamic laws, but generally frowned upon socially. Picking up the check...? That's another story.

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Photo of an indigenous woman with children gathers snow for melting in the Yamalo-Nenets autonomous area of Russia

An indigenous woman with children gathers snow for melting in the Yamalo-Nenets autonomous area of Russia

Sonya Savina

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There are 47 indigenous groups living in Russia, some of them with populations of less than a hundred or even a few dozen. The 2021 All-Russian Population Census showed that the number of indigenous people has substantially declined in the last 10 years.

Russian independent news site Vazhnyye Istorii (Important Stories) reports on certain groups that were already on the verge of extinction, and how their situation has gotten even worse after Russia unleashed a full-scale war in Ukraine.

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