When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

eyes on the U.S.

Donald Trump, International Media Darling-Devil

Donald Trump, International Media Darling-Devil
Worldcrunch

As he rewrites America's political and media playbook, Donald Trump has also now moved swiftly to the center of the worldwide stage. Wins this week in seven of the 11 states holding primaries put the flamboyant billionaire one big step closer to the Republican nomination — and the world's newspapers and magazines are dedicating ample ink to The Donald.

This German daily on Thursday asked: "What if?"

Rheinische Post (Germany)

But a baffled world had plenty of other questions ...

What inspires Americans to vote for Trump? — Het Nieuwsblad (Belgium)

Why this man has put a spell on America —Panorama (Italy)

This leftist French daily has not lost hope ...


[rebelmouse-image 27089981 alt="""" original_size="750x918" expand=1]

What could make Trump stumble — Libération (France)

And The Economist tries to keep up its British good humor:

[rebelmouse-image 27089982 alt="""" original_size="400x526" expand=1]

The Economist (UK)

Following the Super Tuesday results, newspapers focused on the probable showdown in November with Hillary Clinton:

The Age (Australia)

Hillary and Trump take away Super Tuesday — El Heraldo (Honduras)

[rebelmouse-image 27089983 alt="""" original_size="750x919" expand=1]

Towards a Trump-Clinton battle — Le Journal de Montréal (Canada)

DNES (Czech Republic)

E Kathimerini (Greece)

Khorasan (Iran)

[rebelmouse-image 27089984 alt="""" original_size="750x1066" expand=1]

World champions — L'Unita (Italy)

Hindustan Times (India)

Some top international news outlets openly expressed fears about what a Trump-led future might bring:

How dangerous is this man? — Kleine Zeitung (Austria)

[rebelmouse-image 27089985 alt="""" original_size="750x1130" expand=1]

It can always get worse — Die Tageszeitung (Germany)

And alas, the world could not ignore what stands on top:

[rebelmouse-image 27089986 alt="""" original_size="750x1009" expand=1]

The Independent (UK)

New York Post (U.S.)

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Geopolitics

Utter Pessimism, What Israelis And Palestinians Share In Common

Right now, according to a joint survey of Israelis and Palestinians, hopes for a peaceful solution of coexistence simply don't exist. The recent spate of violence is confirmation of the deepest kind of pessimism on both sides for any solution other than domination of the other.

An old Palestinian protester waves Palestinian flag while he confronts the Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the village of Beit Dajan near the West Bank city of Nablus.

A Palestinian protester confronts Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the West Bank village of Beit Dajan on Jan. 6.

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — Just before the latest outbreak of violence between Israelis and Palestinians, a survey of public opinion among the two peoples provided a key to understanding the current situation unfolding before our eyes.

It was a joint study, entitled "Palestinian-Israeli Pulse", carried out by two research centers, one Israeli, the other Palestinian, which for years have been regularly asking the same questions to both sides.

The result is disastrous: not only is the support for the two-state solution — Israel and Palestine side by side — at its lowest point in two decades, but there is now a significant share of opinion on both sides that favors a "non-democratic" solution, i.e., a single state controlled by either the Israelis or Palestinians.

This captures the absolute sense of pessimism commonly felt regarding the chances of the two-state option ever being realized, which currently appears to be our grim reality today. But the results are also an expression of the growing acceptance on both sides that it is inconceivable for either state to live without dominating the other — and therefore impossible to live in peace.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest