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LA STAMPA

After Nice, Jihadist Campaign In Europe In Full Force

Following attacks in Paris, Brussels, Istanbul, and now Nice, Europe must unite to combat the Islamist terror campaign.

A French police officer in Nice the morning after the Bastille Day attack
A French police officer in Nice the morning after the Bastille Day attack
Maurizio Molinari

-Analysis-

TURIN — France attacked on the night of July 14th, the country's national holiday, Bastille Day. It was not by chance that terrorists chose this night to strike, when millions of French citizens were celebrating the storming of the Bastille 227 years ago, when hundreds thronged the Promenade des Anglais on Nice's beachfront. The terrorists' choice reveals an intent to humiliate France on the night when the country is at its strongest, when it remembers its historic revolution and celebrates its prized liberties, on the glamorous Côte d'Azur that symbolizes France's unique charms.

The jihadists are well aware of the identities and national calendars of the countries they attack, using them as a tool to inflict even greater terror — to have citizens "fear death even when they sleep," as once promised by Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, leader of the Islamic State terror group (ISIS). Thursday night in Nice, their weapon of choice was a large truck used to plow through unsuspecting crowds. This tactic, used in the past by "lone wolf" terrorists in minor French cities, also bears similarities to the so-called "Car Intifada" launched by Palestinian insurgents against Israel.

If the deadly shootings in Paris last November heralded the beginning of a long campaign of terror attacks on Europe, and the bombings in Brussels and Istanbul this year revealed the existence of a vast network of sleeper cells, then the massacre in Nice implies the terrorists' offensive is now in full swing. If the nations of Europe are to face down this threat, they must come together to integrate their security services and fashion a new doctrine for collective defense.

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Geopolitics

Utter Pessimism, What Israelis And Palestinians Share In Common

Right now, according to a joint survey of Israelis and Palestinians, hopes for a peaceful solution of coexistence simply don't exist. The recent spate of violence is confirmation of the deepest kind of pessimism on both sides for any solution other than domination of the other.

An old Palestinian protester waves Palestinian flag while he confronts the Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the village of Beit Dajan near the West Bank city of Nablus.

A Palestinian protester confronts Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the West Bank village of Beit Dajan on Jan. 6.

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — Just before the latest outbreak of violence between Israelis and Palestinians, a survey of public opinion among the two peoples provided a key to understanding the current situation unfolding before our eyes.

It was a joint study, entitled "Palestinian-Israeli Pulse", carried out by two research centers, one Israeli, the other Palestinian, which for years have been regularly asking the same questions to both sides.

The result is disastrous: not only is the support for the two-state solution — Israel and Palestine side by side — at its lowest point in two decades, but there is now a significant share of opinion on both sides that favors a "non-democratic" solution, i.e., a single state controlled by either the Israelis or Palestinians.

This captures the absolute sense of pessimism commonly felt regarding the chances of the two-state option ever being realized, which currently appears to be our grim reality today. But the results are also an expression of the growing acceptance on both sides that it is inconceivable for either state to live without dominating the other — and therefore impossible to live in peace.

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