When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Terror in Europe

Terror In Brussels, 21 World Front Pages

Terror In Brussels, 21 World Front Pages
Worldcrunch

Most of the world's front pages Wednesday are dedicated to the terrorist attacks in Brussels, the day after a series of explosions attacks killed at least 34 and wounded hundreds.

BELGIUM

"The day everyone feared" — De Standaard

[rebelmouse-image 27090052 alt="""" original_size="750x1117" expand=1]

"Right in our heart" — De Tijd

[rebelmouse-image 27090053 alt="""" original_size="926x1200" expand=1]

"Our darkest day" — Het Belang Van Limburg

[rebelmouse-image 27090054 alt="""" original_size="651x959" expand=1]

"Hold strong" — Le Soir

[rebelmouse-image 27090055 alt="""" original_size="687x1024" expand=1]

De Morgen


FRANCE

[rebelmouse-image 27090056 alt="""" original_size="750x932" expand=1]

Libération

"Europe under attack" — Les Echos

[rebelmouse-image 27090057 alt="""" original_size="750x1109" expand=1]

"Terror over the city" — La Dépêche du Midi

[rebelmouse-image 27090058 alt="""" original_size="750x1015" expand=1]

"War in Europe" — Le Parisien


GERMANY

[rebelmouse-image 27090059 alt="""" original_size="625x840" expand=1]

Kleine Zeitung


SWITZERLAND

"Attack in the heart of the EU" — Basler Zeitung



PORTUGAL

"Terror in Brussels" — Publico


ITALY

Il Tempo

"Europe under attack" — Corriere della Sera

"The Brussels kamikazes left free to kill" — Il Fatto Quotidiano


LEBANON

[rebelmouse-image 27090060 alt="""" original_size="750x1080" expand=1]

""EURISIS" capital bleeds" — Al-Akhbar


ARGENTINA

[rebelmouse-image 27090061 alt="""" original_size="750x1040" expand=1]

"ISIS terror strikes again: 34 dead in Brussels" — Clarin


PERU

[rebelmouse-image 27090062 alt="""" original_size="750x1176" expand=1]

"New blow to Europe" — El Comercio


TURKEY

"Terror in the heart of the EU" — Türkiye


UNITED STATES

[rebelmouse-image 27090063 alt="""" original_size="750x1583" expand=1]

The Seattle Times

[rebelmouse-image 27090064 alt="""" original_size="750x1369" expand=1]

The Boston Globe

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Society

Gluten-Free In France: Stepping Out Of The Shadows, Heading Upmarket

For those in the haute cuisine world of French food, a no-gluten diet (whether by choice or health requirements) has long been a virtual source of shame. But bakers, chefs and pastry makers are now taking the diet to whole new levels of taste and variety.

photo of a man carrying bread in a field

Entrepreneur Adriano Farano, in Sicily, where his company's wheat is grown

Adriano Farano's Instagram page
David Barroux

PARIS — The "gluten-free" aren’t hiding anymore.

Whether they avoid the grain protein by choice or by obligation — due to taste, allergies or an intolerance — many stick to a diet seen by the outside world as a little bit funny, or perhaps simply just bland.

For some, being gluten-free even came with some amount of self-consciousness: about being that person, the one who announced at the beginning of dinner that they wouldn’t be eating that bread, or that pasta, or that pastry — or about coming across as precious and complicated, or worse, as a killjoy for everyone else’s gustatory pleasure.

For those who feel that it is hard to speak up, it's often easier just to keep the gluten intolerance to themselves and eat only the vegetables at meals, abstaining from bread and dessert to avoid stomach cramps.

But the times, they are a-changin'. Living without gluten used to feel punitive; now it feels more like an option. The number of gluten-free products has exploded, in both quantity and quality, and there’s never been a better time to join the "no-glu" camp.

In supermarkets, bakeries and restaurants, there are increasingly varied alternatives to gluten. And demand is just as high — €1 billion per year in sales in France alone, according to Nielsen. The research consultancy found that 3% of French households were gluten-free in 2019. Now, that number is 4.4%, which is twice as high as the number of “strictly vegetarian” households.

According to market research firm Kantar, the frequency and number of purchases, as well as the average amount spent for gluten-free products, continues to increase — up 6% compared with 2019.

In this context, it’s hardly surprising that gluten-free alternatives are becoming increasingly chic.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest