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Meet Nemeïo, The World's First Universal Keyboard

Researchers in France have come up with a small but uber-adaptable prototype that could soon change how we type — and in any language we choose.

The Nemeïo keyboard is 100% customizable
The Nemeïo keyboard is 100% customizable
Léa Delpont

LYON — Navigate the web in English, write an email in Mandarin, format a spreadsheet in German. All of this is possible thanks to the keyboard built by the Lyon-based business LDLC. The "Nemeïo," as it's called, weighs 600 grams and includes 81 completely customizable keys.

LDLC, the French leader in e-commerce technology, thinks it has found "the Holy Grail" of the tech community: a universally dynamic keyboard. Designed by the firm's R&D team, Nemeïo is "a mechanical keyboard that contains an e-paper display screen, similar to those in reading lamps, under 81 transparent keys," explains Olivier de la Clergerie, LDLC's director general. The advantage of Nemeïo is that it is 100% customizable with its use of electronic ink.

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Society

Urban Indigenous: How Peru's Shipibo-Conibo Keep Amazon Culture Alive In The City

For four years, indigenous photographer David Díaz Gonzales has documented the lives and movements of his Shipibo-Conibo community, as many of them migrated from their native Peruvian Amazon to the city. A work of remembrance and resistance.

For Shipibo-Conibo women, sporting a fringe is usually a sign of celebration or ceremony.

Rosa Chávez Yacila

YARINACOCHA — It was decades ago when the Shipibo-Conibo left their settlements along the banks of the Ucayali River, in eastern Peru, to begin a great migration to the cities. Still among the largest Amazonian communities in Peru — 32,964 according to the Ministry of Culture — though most Shipibo-Conibo now live in the urban district of Yarinacocha.

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