When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

LGBTQ Plus

Unsafe At Home, Central America's LGBTQ Must Flee For Their Lives

Guatemala has become a transit country for migrants seeking to reach the United States, but it is also a hub for those seeking refuge. Hundreds of migrants remain trapped waiting to be considered as refugees. The chances of receiving a positive response are slim, especially for the LGBTQ community.

GUATEMALA CITY — Madelyn is a 22-year-old trans woman. In Nov. 2021, she migrated from Tegucigalpa, the capital of Honduras, to Guatemala City after being repeatedly harassed and attacked by gang members in her country.

Every year, hundreds of migrants arrive in Guatemala to request refuge. In 2019, there were 494 people; in 2020, 487; in 2021, 1,054 and 70 more in Jan. 2022 alone. Everyone must wait at least two years for a resolution, and migration statistics reveal that only 1.7 out of 10 migrants receive a yes as an answer to their asylum request. The situation is more dramatic for applicants from the LGBTQ community because only 2 out of 100 people are accepted.

Watch Video Show less

Mamma, The Last To Know: On My Trans Son's Coming Out

Italian writer Lia Celi has her would-be mother's "sixth sense" put to the test.

-Essay-

RIMINI — Vienna, city of the Habsburgs and the waltz, Sachertorte and Secession. To me, as of 2018, Vienna also became the city of shocks. It was in the Austrian capital, at a restaurant table, that my 18-year-old son announced to me, in all seriousness: "I'm trans." First shock, followed by the second: "My siblings have known for a while now."

That's the theory of moms' sixth sense settled. Everyone in the family knew, it was just me who didn't have a clue. I'm far from a absent mom — I've always worked from home — and haven't missed a minute of raising my four children. And yet...

Keep reading... Show less

The Mortal Danger Of Being Trans In Latin America

The murder of a trans activist in Honduras, and new report on violence against LGBTQ+ across the region, shines a light on the place where it's simply not safe to be a trans person.

BOGOTÁ — On September 26, Honduran trans rights activist Tatiana García was stabbed to death in her home in the western city of Santa Rosa de Copán. The targeted murder also put a tragic end to García's work helping LGBTQ+ people to file hate-crime complaints in Honduras — indeed, she was the 17th LGBTQ+, and fourth trans, murder victim this year in the country of 9.9 million people.

In a region with a long history of violence toward LGBTQ+, Honduras is among the most dangerous places in Latin America to be gay, lesbian or trans. In June, the Interamerican Court of Human Rights held the Honduran state responsible for the 2009 death of trans activist Vicky Hernandez. The court ordered the country to carry out a public act of recognition of responsibility and to adopt a procedure to recognize gender identity in identity documents, and other measures to defend LGBTQ+ rights.

Keep reading... Show less
EXPLORE OTHER TOPICS