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TOPIC: cristina kirchner

In The News

China Rolls Back Zero-COVID, Democrats Win In Georgia, Morocco Celebrates

👋 Kamusta!*

Welcome to Wednesday, where China abandons key parts of its Zero-COVID strategy, U.S. Democrats secure a 51-49 majority of the Senate with a runoff victory in Georgia and Morocco makes history at the World Cup in Qatar. Meanwhile, French daily Les Echos looks at the unlikely methods Paris’ authorities are applying to detect and neutralize drones that could potentially be used as weapons by terrorists.

[*Tagalog, Philippines]

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Nuclear Experts Arrive At Zaporizhzhia, UN Condemns China For Uyghur Crimes, “Just Serena”

👋 សួស្តី!*

Welcome to Thursday, where the team of UN nuclear experts have arrived at Zaporizhzhia after being delayed by shelling, the UN reports “serious human rights violations” in China’s treatment of Muslim minorities, and Serena Williams’ on-court interview goes viral. And for Global Press Journal, Coraly Cruz Mejías looks at the effects of Puerto Rico’s updated gun laws.

[*Susadei - Khmer, Cambodia]

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Argentina's Prohibitive Presidential Front-Runner, In His Own Words

An interview with Peronist candidate Albérto Fernández, who together with his running mate — former president Cristina Kirchner — is looking to unseat Mauricio Macri.

There are still two months before Argentines select their next leader, and depending on the outcome, there could also be a runoff in December. But after last week's PASO — as the country's primary-election mechanism is known — there is a widespread perception that voters have already made their choice.

The decade-old PASO system is particular in that it involves all of the country's parties and potential presidential candidates, and is thus more of a preview election than a simple weeding out process. In this case, the Aug. 11 vote also proved to be something of a spoiler given the disparity between the top two finishers: Peronist candidate Alberto Fernández and current President Mauricio Macri.

Polls predicted that Fernández would top Macri in the PASO, but not, as it turned out, by more than 15 percentage points (47.7% versus 32.1%). As a result, many now see the Oct. 27 presidential election as a done deal, and view Fernández as a kind of de facto president-elect. The fact that none of this will be official for at least another nine weeks makes the whole process even more curious.

In an exclusive interview with Clarín, the Peronist candidate opens up about his better-than-expected PASO victory, and looks ahead to October and beyond.

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New Argentine President Sworn In

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La Capital, Dec. 11, 2015

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CLARIN
Dante Caputo

Macri's Challenge: How To Lift A Defensive, Fearful Argentina

Argentina's next president, the center-right Mauricio Macri, must be deft in reforming the economy of a society that has moved beyond a developmental stage, to one that sees itself as "at risk."

-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — The reality is that a president can wield only so much influence. Most of the issues a government today must deal with are driven by outside forces across an arc of time that extends beyond any one mandate: mediating between different interests, responding to society's entrenched and often urgent demands, making sure the state and its bureaucracy work reasonably well. After that, the president is left with a time slot in which he or she decides what to do and what to build, in line with chosen objectives.

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blog

Extra! 'They Killed Nisman'

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Clarín, March 6, 2015

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Extra! China's People's Daily Ignores Kirchner Twitter Insult

Argentinian President Cristina Kirchner came under intense criticism after she mocked Chinese pronunciation on Twitter while on a state visit to China seeking investment. But there was no mention of the diplomatic faux pas in the Thursday edition of Chinese newspaper People's Daily, which instead chose to feature a picture of a friendly, if slightly stiff, handshake between Kirchner and Chinese President Xi Jinping on its front page.

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Extra! Argentina Protests Suspicious Death Of Prosecutor

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La Nación (Argentina) January 20 2015

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CLARIN
Annabella Quiroga

Wealthy Argentines Eye Miami Real Estate, And Culture

With Argentina's economy in crisis, Miami real estate has become a nice refuge for well-off Argentines to protect their money from devaluation. But it's not just about the beaches

BUENOS AIRES — With Argentine markets paralyzed by restrictions on dollar trading and local property transactions plummeting, Miami real estate developers have their sights set on private Argentine investors looking for a foreign refuge for their assets.

As President Cristina Kirchner reported last year, Argentines spent more than $2 billion on U.S. property investments in 2012 and 2013. Buenos Aires even hosted several real estate fairs in August and September to highlight some of the projects on offer.

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CLARIN

Adios Buenos Aires? Why Moving Argentina's Capital Is A Dangerous Idea

For the Argentine daily Clarin, the proposal backed by President Kirchner to move the capital to a much smaller city is not just wrong for practical reasons, but a sign of something more sinister.

-OpEd-

BUENOS AIRES — While Argentina still faces the threat of a national default, the country has been in the news for another reason: the growing number of public figures, including President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, who favor proposals to move the nation's capital from Buenos Aires to the much smaller (and apparently much, much quieter) northern city of Santiago del Estero.

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CLARIN
Luis Alberto Romero

Argentina Of Kirchner: Populism Or Kleptocracy?

Critics of both Nestor and Cristina Kirchner have focused on the "populist" nature of their hold on power. But to understand their rule, it may be wiser to follow the money.

-OpEd-

BUENOS AIRES Kleptocracy, derived from Greek, is government by thieves. While it may sound Aristotelian, it is a word coined in the early 19th century and its usage has recently spread in political parlance.

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