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Turnbull and Modi in New Delhi on April 10
Turnbull and Modi in New Delhi on April 10

-Analysis-

"The DPRK North Korea is ready to react to any mode of war desired by the U.S." Coming in response to the U.S. deployment of a navy battle group to the Korean Peninsula, this chilling statement from the North Korean foreign ministry suggests that Donald Trump's muscle-flexing has only raised the stakes in what words come from Kim Jong-un's regime. And the regime's actions? Intelligence reports saying that Pyongyang could be less than two years away from being able to strike the U.S., and with a potential sixth nuclear weapon test this Saturday to mark the birth of late leader Kim Il-sung, the risk of an actual nuclear strike, though remote, is increasing.

But the nuclear question also looms beyond the Korean Peninsula. Yesterday in New Delhi, Prime Ministers Malcolm Turnbull and Narendra Modi signed a deal under which Australia, which has 40% of the world's uranium reserves, will supply uranium to India — one of the world's three declared nuclear powers that aren't parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. The other two are ... North Korea and Pakistan, India's direct neighbor with which it's still in a decades-long conflict.

More and more nations feel entitled to pursue their own nuclear capability, seen both as a matter of national sovereignty and an entry ticket to the big leagues.

There is also, perhaps most frightening of all, the threat of terrorist organizations the like of ISIS getting their hands on radioactive material to make dirty bombs, as TIME reports in a bloodcurdling piece.

It is perhaps a direct consequence of an increasingly multipolar world and of the shift in the balance of power from the West to the developing nations of the East: More and more nations feel entitled to pursue their own nuclear capability, seen both as a matter of national sovereignty and an entry ticket to the big leagues. While every passing day makes the dream of a denuclearized world look more distant, the regime in Pyongyang and more aggressive tone from Washington remind us that nothing guarantees that Hiroshima and Nagasaki won't have their sequel.

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Society

Jehovah's Witnesses Translate The Bible In Indigenous Language — Is This Colonialism?

The Jehovah's Witnesses in Chile have launched a Bible version translated into the native Mapudungun language, evidently indifferent to the concerns of a nation striving to save its identity from the Western cultural juggernaut.

A Mapuche family awaits for Chilean President Gabriel Boric to arrive at the traditional Te Deum in the Cathedral of Santiago, on Chile's Independence Day.

Claudia Andrade

NEUQUÉN — The Bible can now be read in Mapuzugun, the language of the Mapuche, an ancestral nation living across Chile and Argentina. It took the Chilean branch of the Jehovah's Witnesses, a latter-day Protestant church often associated with door-to-door proselytizing and cold calling, three years to translate it into "21st-century Mapuzugun".

The church's Mapuche members in Chile welcomed the book when it was launched in Santiago last June, but some of their brethren see it rather as a cultural imposition. The Mapuche were historically a fighting nation, and fiercely resisted both the Spanish conquerors and subsequent waves of European settlers. They are still fighting for land rights in Chile.

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