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Ideas

The Lesson Of Bucha: There's Only One Way To Defeat A War Criminal

Western civilization, having experienced so many wars and acts of terrorism, has created elaborate schemes to protect the peace and civilian populations in particular. Vladimir Putin has shown that it is simply not enough. We must fight and die to protect what is most precious, says Ukrainian writer Anna Akage.

Photo of Ukrainian soldiers arriving in Bucha on Sunday

Ukrainian soldiers arrive in Bucha on Sunday

Matthew Hatcher/SOPA Images/ZUMA
Anna Akage

On Friday, April 1, the body of Ukrainian photographer Maks Levin, who had been missing for three weeks, was found north of Kyiv. He was lying, unarmed, with a camera in front of him and in civilian clothing, just wearing a jacket that read “Press.” Investigators say he was killed at close range by two bullets of small-arms fire from the Russian military.

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Two days later, just 20 kilometers to the south, the town of Bucha, a relatively affluent Kyiv suburb, would become a location destined for wartime infamy as Russian troops abandoned it on a retreat from the region. With the images of mass graves and dead civilians strewn on the street, the news of Levin's death went somewhere in the subconscious.

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Society

Urban Indigenous: How Peru's Shipibo-Conibo Keep Amazon Culture Alive In The City

For four years, indigenous photographer David Díaz Gonzales has documented the lives and movements of his Shipibo-Conibo community, as many of them migrated from their native Peruvian Amazon to the city. A work of remembrance and resistance.

For Shipibo-Conibo women, sporting a fringe is usually a sign of celebration or ceremony.

Rosa Chávez Yacila

YARINACOCHA — It was decades ago when the Shipibo-Conibo left their settlements along the banks of the Ucayali River, in eastern Peru, to begin a great migration to the cities. Still among the largest Amazonian communities in Peru — 32,964 according to the Ministry of Culture — though most Shipibo-Conibo now live in the urban district of Yarinacocha.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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