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Flags and bridges in Taipei
Where are the lads?
Arnaud de La Grange

PARIS — Donald Tusk had a dream: The United Kingdom was staying in the European Union — For him, this vision isn't just a pure imaginary digression. The European Council president even appealed to the words of one of Britain's most famous voices, quoting John Lennon's "Imagine": "You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one."

Not the only one to dream? Probably not, judging by the wave of recent statements. In his interview this week to Le Figaro, along with seven other European newspapers, French President Emmanuel Macron said "the door is open until the moment you walk through it." In Berlin, meanwhile, German officials think "it would be great if they were to reverse the Brexit decision." One wonders if Europeans truly believe a U-turn is possible or whether they're just being mischievous, pleased to have the chance to tease British Prime Minister Theresa May, who for a long time appeared so self-confident…

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Society

End Of Roe v. Wade: Will It Spark Anti-Abortion Momentum Around The World?

Pro-life activists celebrated the end of the U.S. right to abortion, hoping it will trigger a new debate on a topic that in some places had largely been settled: in favor a woman’s right to choose. But it could also boomerang.

Thousands of people demonstrate against abortion in Madrid

Lisa Berdet, Lila Paulou and Shaun Lavelle

The Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling establishing a constitutional right to abortion put the United States at the forefront of abortion rights in the world.

Other countries would follow suit in the succeeding years, with France legalizing abortion in 1975, Italy in 1978, and Ireland finally joining most of the rest of Europe with a landslide 2018 referendum victory for women’s right to choose. Elsewhere, parts of Asia and Africa have made incremental steps toward legalizing abortion, while a growing number of Latin American countries have joined what has now been a decades-long worldwide shift toward more access to abortion rights.

But now, 49 years later, with last Friday’s landmark overturning of Roe v. Wade, will the U.S. once again prove to be ahead of the curve? Will American cultural and political influence carry across borders on the abortion issue, reversing the momentum of recent years?

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