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EL ESPECTADOR

For Trump and Rubio, 'Fixing' Venezuela Is A Recipe For Votes

The aggressive Republican stance on Venezuela reflects an attempt to seduce Latino voters in Florida.

Senator Marco Rubio speaks about Venezuela at rally in Miami, Florida on Feb. 18, 2019
Senator Marco Rubio speaks about Venezuela at rally in Miami, Florida on Feb. 18, 2019
Alvaro Forero Tascón

BOGOTÁ — Why has an isolationist U.S. president like Donald Trump suddenly become interventionist in Venezuela? The explanation may be, as U.S. Congressman "Tip" O'Neill once said, that "all politics is local." Especially when it is in your backyard.

While campaigning, Trump was dismissive of the Florida Senator and rival candidate Marco Rubio, whom he called Little Marco. He suggested Rubio did no work because he had one of the worst records of attendance at Senate sessions. The contempt was mutual. Rubio referred to Trump's small hands, "and you know what they say about men with small hands."

Trump_Venezuela_Miami_Rally

Trump addresses Venezuelan-Americans in Miami, Florida on Feb. 18 — Photo: The White House.

It may be surprising then, as the New York Times has observed, that Senator Rubio has worked so hard to educate Trump about, and boost his interest in Latin America, practically forging and coordinating from the Senate a foreign policy directed against Venezuela's President Nicolás Maduro. This energetic, proactive approach is perhaps explained by Florida's crucial role in assuring any presidential candidate's victory in the U.S. electoral system. It is not only the state that most closely reflects national behavior, but also has the highest number of Electoral College votes among swing states. Above all, it is the state where the "white" vote for Trump is least decisive. Florida's large Hispanic population determined the Republicans' 2-3% advantage over the Democrats in the last elections, so the party is particularly dependent on this sector of voters. And in Florida, where Venezuela has gradually replaced Cuba as the issue of major concern for Hispanic voters, their perception of Trump's ability to overthrow Maduro is a decisive factor in winning the Latino vote.

Latinos would vote for Trump if he can remove Maduro from power.

Rubio knows this and must have explained it to Trump. Presumably, he pointed out that Latinos would vote for Trump in spite of his disdain and prejudices against them, if he can remove Maduro from power. Rubio is effectively going all out with Venezuela because he knows his constituents well. Presumably, his support and that of his constituents depend on ending the complacent policies presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama initially had towards Venezuela.

Recent polls must have been giving Trump wind of this reality. The website Politico cites one indicating that only 40% of Florida voters would back a second Trump term, while 53% oppose his reelection. As the pollster Fernand Amandi told the website, if you were a politician facing such dismal support rates, you would inevitably "spend more time consolidating your base."

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Society

Jehovah's Witnesses Translate The Bible In Indigenous Language — Is This Colonialism?

The Jehovah's Witnesses in Chile have launched a Bible version translated into the native Mapudungun language, evidently indifferent to the concerns of a nation striving to save its identity from the Western cultural juggernaut.

A Mapuche family awaits for Chilean President Gabriel Boric to arrive at the traditional Te Deum in the Cathedral of Santiago, on Chile's Independence Day.

Claudia Andrade

NEUQUÉN — The Bible can now be read in Mapuzugun, the language of the Mapuche, an ancestral nation living across Chile and Argentina. It took the Chilean branch of the Jehovah's Witnesses, a latter-day Protestant church often associated with door-to-door proselytizing and cold calling, three years to translate it into "21st-century Mapuzugun".

The church's Mapuche members in Chile welcomed the book when it was launched in Santiago last June, but some of their brethren see it rather as a cultural imposition. The Mapuche were historically a fighting nation, and fiercely resisted both the Spanish conquerors and subsequent waves of European settlers. They are still fighting for land rights in Chile.

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