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"Crime Contra O Brasil" - 21 International Front Pages Of Brasilia Riots

Newspapers in Brazil, as well as elsewhere in North and South America and Europe, marked the unprecedented attack on Brazilian democracy.

"Crime Contra O Brasil" - 21 International Front Pages Of Brasilia Riots

Calm was restored in Brazil’s capital Brasilia, a day after thousands of supporters of former far-right President Jair Bolsonaro invaded and vandalized the presidential palace, the country's Congress and the Supreme Court.

Police arrested an estimated 400 protesters. Newly-reelected President Lula's condemned the rioters as "fascists, fanatics" whom he vowed to punish "with the full force of law." World leaders meanwhile also denounced the assault, which U.S. President Joe Biden called "outrageous" and Argentinian President Alberto Fernandez a "coup attempt."

Meanwhile, Bolsonaro — who flew to Miami last week ahead of Lula's inauguration — offered a muted and delayed criticism of the attack.

This is how newspapers in Brazil, Latin America and the rest of the world featured the unprecedented attack on the government’s sites on their front pages.


Brazil

O Dia

Extra

Estado de Minas

Correio

O Globo

VENEZUELA

Diario 2001

URUGUAY

El País

PARAGUAY

La Nación

COLOMBIA

El Heraldo

El Espectador

CHILE

La Tercera

El Mercurio

BOLIVIA

Correo del Sur

ARGENTINA

La Nación

U.S.

The Washington Post

U.K.

The Independent

ITALY

La Stampa

Corriere della Sera

SPAIN

ABC

El País

FRANCE

Le Monde

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