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LES ECHOS

The Paris Academy Grooming Migrants For A "Refined" Life In France

A school founded in 2008 offers classes in literature, cuisine and the finer points of French culture and language to a new class of refugees from around the world every year to help them integrate to their new home.

Two symbols, one country
Two symbols, one country
Maryline Baumard

PARIS — On the dance floor, a sneaker brushes past a ballet shoe in a slow waltz. "Left goes back, then right. Now together." Roland d'Anna, dressed in all black, is directing the class like an orchestra conductor. It's an old habit. D'Anna says it's hard to keep track of the celebrities — from Charles de Gaulle to Karl Lagerfeld to Laure Manaudou — who have graced the parquet of his prestigious dance studio Georges & Rosy.

But today his pupils aren't so illustrious. Abid, Lemlem and Andro are among the students at the Pierre Claver Association, which welcomes, educates and provides legal assistance to migrants. Just steps away from the National Assembly, the Pierre Claver school offers made-to-measure education to refugees from around the world. Dance is a part of its unique approach to teaching national culture. Along with literature, cuisine and drama, the finer points of French culture are given a place next to intensive French language lessons.

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Ideas

Artificial Satellite Pollution, Perils For Biodiversity In Space And On Earth

Exploiting space resources and littering it with satellite and other anthropogenic objects is endangering the ecosystem of space, which also damages the earth and its creatures below.

Image of the small satellite NanoRacks-Remove Debris satellite deployed into space by the ISS

Thomas Lewton

Outer space isn’t what most people would think of as an ecosystem. Its barren and frigid void isn’t exactly akin to the verdant canopies of a rainforest or to the iridescent shoals that swim among coral cities. But if we are to become better stewards of the increasingly frenzied band of orbital space above our atmosphere, a shift to thinking of it as an ecosystem — as part of an interconnected system of living things interacting with their physical environment — may be just what we need.

Last month, in the journal Nature Astronomy, a collective of 11 astrophysicists and space scientists proposed we do just that, citing the proliferation of anthropogenic space objects. Thousands of satellites currently orbit the Earth, with commercial internet providers such as SpaceX’s Starlink launching new ones at a dizzying pace. Based on proposals for projects in the future, the authors note, the number could reach more than a hundred thousand within the decade. Artificial satellites, long a vital part of the space ecosystem, have arguably become an invasive species.

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