When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Worldcrunch

ÉPOCA (Brazil)

SÃO PAULO - We can all agree that Brazil is the country of beautiful beaches, sensual rhythms and slim, gorgeous bodies. Right? Well, at least for that last category, we may have to leave things loose on our definitions.

Once considered worldwide sex symbols of toned slimness, the ladies of Brazil are starting to look at their body images with a different, some would say, more realistic perspective. The Brazilian weekly news magazine Época published the results of a study of attitudes and self-awareness of some 15,000 women over the age of 16, from a range of different social classes. Most of the respondents (72%) claimed to like rounder bodies better than skinny ones. And 59% would be happy to have a fuller shape.

This trend can also be seen in the world of celebrities, where the Brazilian supermodel Gisele Bündchen (see below) had long set the standard for what woman were supposed to aspire toward appearance-wise.

"The model for beauty is no longer that of the fashion shows. That is not considered so attractive or sensual anymore," says Renato Meirelles, CEO of Data Popular research institute, which conducted the survey.

Miss Brazil Plus Size, a beauty contest for overweight women, is an example of the changes in national culture. The most recent winner weighs 98 kilograms (216 lbs). Famous brand C&A invited the chubby chanteuse Preta Gil to be its ad girl, with a new collection based on her look set to be released this month.

In the pop world, singer Gaby Amarantos (see below), who tips the scales at 76 kilograms (168 lbs) and actor Tiago Abravanel are further proof of this change. Gaby sings sexy songs and Tiago will play a Don Juan role in an upcoming prime time soap opera.



source: Wikipedia

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Economy

Europe's Winter Energy Crisis Has Already Begun

in the face of Russia's stranglehold over supplies, the European Commission has proposed support packages and price caps. But across Europe, fears about the cost of living are spreading – and with it, doubts about support for Ukraine.

Protesters on Thursday in the German state of Thuringia carried Russian flags and signs: 'First our country! Life must be affordable.'

Martin Schutt/dpa via ZUMA
Stefanie Bolzen, Philipp Fritz, Virginia Kirst, Martina Meister, Mandoline Rutkowski, Stefan Schocher, Claus, Christian Malzahn and Nikolaus Doll

-Analysis-

In her State of the Union address on September 14, European Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen, issued an urgent appeal for solidarity between EU member states in tackling the energy crisis, and towards Ukraine. Von der Leyen need only look out her window to see that tensions are growing in capital cities across Europe due to the sharp rise in energy prices.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

In the Czech Republic, people are already taking to the streets, while opposition politicians elsewhere are looking to score points — and some countries' support for Ukraine may start to buckle.

With winter approaching, Europe is facing a true test of both its mettle, and imagination.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ