When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

CLARIN

In Sprawling Buenos Aires, Historic Architecture Lives On

Modern Buenos Aires can overwhelm much of its vintage architecture, but like tough old weeds, certain significant buildings have been able to survive or find new life.

Buenos Aires' Luis Mario Campo hotel
Buenos Aires' Luis Mario Campo hotel
Berto Gonzalez Montaner

BUENOS AIRES — The modern city of Buenos Aires is advancing relentlessly as multiple mechanisms engineer its growth. Like lava, it can engulf old construction, though it can also clone buildings, which multiply to cover one or several blocks. In the best cases, there is repair, recycling and substitution of aging infrastructure that is crucial to the fabric of the city.

Until recently, a garden in front of the neo-classical Italian Club beautifully framed and provided a perspective onto the old building. But in recent years, giant shopping centers gobbled that up.

[rebelmouse-image 27088157 alt="""" original_size="800x533" expand=1]

Buenos Aires skyline — Photo: Luis Argerich

In the same district, mere meters from a statue of El Cid, sits what may be the oldest house in the district of Caballito. Built in 1864, it was the home of Jerónimo Podestá, the controversial Bishop of Avellaneda who lived there with his wife, Clelio Luro. The Latin American Federation of Married Priests was formed there.

Little is visible from outside the house, on 1367 Avenida Gaona. Visitors must cross a plush garden to find the building's columned porch. The city parliament classified the house as a place of cultural interest in 2004, and the bishop's step-daughter says it is to become a museum and place of “philosophical, religious and social” reflection.

There must be thousands of buildings like this quietly sitting in the shadow of a city that is restlessly sprawling. Consider the Palacio Roccatagliata, and the housing project taking shape over the early 20th century building between Ricardo Balbín and Roosevelt avenues. The owners of the emblematic Confitería del Molino used to live here. Now some investors are building luxury flats here, though the city courts have ordered it stopped for the time being.

[rebelmouse-image 27088158 alt="""" original_size="1024x768" expand=1]

The old and the young in Buenos Aires — Photo: Jenny Mealing

The architects want to create an L-shaped building that would cover two corners, and “nurse” the old palace inside its grounds. Conceptually, it seems perfect. One of the wings of the new building, 13 floors high, provides a reasonable and adequate cover for its street corner. But the other wing, which is twice as high, seems disproportionate.

There is also repair work going on. Once-worthless old buildings are taking revenge. There is, for example, a grey, abandoned warehouse at the heart of a block in Old Palermo. Artist and therapist Diana Schufer has turned it into a studio residence with a long corridor and a courtyard filled with plants and beautiful aromas. The old warehouse has become both her home and — every Friday and Saturday, with the help of her friend Olga Martínez — a magnificent art gallery.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Future

Injecting Feminism Into Science Is A Good Thing — For Science

Feminists have generated a set of tools to make science less biased and more robust. Why don’t more scientists use it?

As objective as any man

Anto Magzan/ZUMA
Rachel E. Gross

-Essay-

In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, a mystery played out across news headlines: Men, it seemed, were dying of infection at twice the rate of women. To explain this alarming disparity, researchers looked to innate biological differences between the sexes — for instance, protective levels of sex hormones, or distinct male-female immune responses. Some even went so far as to test the possibility of treating infected men with estrogen injections.

This focus on biological sex differences turned out to be woefully inadequate, as a group of Harvard-affiliated researchers pointed out earlier this year. By analyzing more than a year of sex-disaggregated COVID-19 data, they showed that the gender gap was more fully explained by social factors like mask-wearing and distancing behaviors (less common among men) and testing rates (higher among pregnant women and health workers, who were largely female).

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ