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Buenos Aires' Casa de los Lirios
Buenos Aires' Casa de los Lirios

BUENOS AIRES — A new map of the Argentine capital shows 50 Art Nouveau buildings, a style of art and architecture popular from 1890 to 1910, putting the city at the forefront of early 20th century architecture.

Some are impressive at first glance, like the Casal expand=1] de Cataluña in the heart of the San Telmo district, or the House of Peacocks by architect Virginio Colombo, in Balvanera.

Another hallmark is the Casa de los Lirios on the Avenida Rivadavia, so close in style to houses designed by Antoni Gaudí in Barcelona.

Photo: ArquiViajes via Twitter

Some of these architectural treasures are in decline and in need of urgent repairs, among them El expand=1] Molino, the former pastry shop opposite the parliament buildings.

Photos: jplpagan via Flickr / puroticorico via Flickr / Liam Quinn via Flickr / eli_try via Instagram / Worldcrunch

All of these landmarks, and more, help to position Buenos Aires as the city with the foremost Art Nouveau treasury in the Americas. Each of these places is adorned with exquisite artistry both inside and outside, and a non-profit group has decided to put them on the map, quite literally.

The Buenos Aires Art Nouveau Association (AANBA) has created five sight-seeing routes in five districts — San Telmo, Recoleta, Congreso, Balvanera and Centro — and the map of the routes is available free in hotels, shops and other information points.

Other highlights on the routes include the Barolo expand=1] building and mall, an architectural homage to Dante’s Inferno, which is dotted with Hindu motifs and mystical references.

Palacio Barolo. Photos: Phillip Capper via CC / Gustav’s via Flickr / adrianfidalgo via Instagram / Worldcrunch

Then there’s the Otto Wulff building, a former embassy of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

[rebelmouse-image 27087813 alt="""" original_size="640x426" expand=1]

Photo: HalloweenHJB via CC

The map aims to explain the buildings’ histories, purpose and usage, but also to remind the public that they must be valued and preserved as “a cultural good that belongs to all,” says Willy Pastrana, AANBA president. The organization wants Buenos Aires to be declared the Latin American capital of Art Nouveau.

Partial reproduction of Recoleta Tour via AANBA Facebook page

“Buenos Aires was at the vanguard of architecture” at the time, says one of the city’s leading architects Luis Grossman, so “it is a valid proposal.”

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

"Welcome To Our Hell..." Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba Speaks

In a rare in-depth interview, Ukraine's top diplomat didn't hold back as he discussed NATO, E.U. candidacy, and the future of the war with Russia. He also reserves a special 'thank you' for Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi.

Dmytro Kuleba, Foreign Minister of Ukraine attends the summit of foreign ministers of the G7 group of leading democratic economic powers.

Oleg Bazar

KYIV — This is the first major interview Ukrainian Minister of Foreign Affairs Dmytro Kuleba has given. He spoke to the Ukrainian publication Livy Bereg about NATO, international assistance and confrontation with Russia — on the frontline and in the offices of the European Parliament.

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At 41, Kuleba is the youngest ever foreign minister of Ukraine. He is the former head of the Commission for Coordination of Euro-Atlantic Integration and initiated Ukraine's accession to the European Green Deal. The young but influential pro-European politician is now playing a complicated political game in order to attract as many foreign partners as possible to support Ukraine not only in the war, but also when the war ends.

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