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Deep In The Ozark Mountains, the KKK Is Still Alive

With its racist ideology and its customs from another era, the KKK is still poisoning the minds of children and wreaking havoc. The movement aspires to create a "new white America."

A KKK cross-burning rally
A KKK cross-burning rally
Julie Zaugg

BOONE COUNTYThe humidity is such that the air here in Arkansas seems almost sticky. The forest, dark against the rosy dusk sky, resonates with the sound of insects. A small group of people dressed in long white robes emerges from a small house carrying wooden weapons. On their heads are conical masks that cover all but their eyes. On their chests each has a red circle with a white cross and a drop of blood on it.

The spectral silhouettes form a circle around a large wooden cross in the middle of the clearing. One of them has a flaming torch emitting an orange light. The participants pass the flame to each other before stepping forward to the petrol-soaked cross and lighting it. The fire spreads quickly. All the members return to their positions and raise their right arm. Suddenly, they shout, "White Power!" The burning cross crackles. The smell of petrol floats in the air.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Kharkiv Revisited: Inside Russia's New Assault On The "Hero City" Of Ukraine

The nation's second-largest city, Kharkiv was quiet for weeks after Ukrainian forces took control. But now it is again under attack as Russia pushes to capture the city that's considered the "gateway" to Ukraine. Die Welt reports from the frontline.

Damages due to Russian shelling in Kharkiv, Ukraine

Alfred Hackensberger

KHARKIV — "Come, I want to show you something," Denys Vezenych says, opening the door of his dental office.

The 40-year-old begins to tell the story in the waiting room: "It was April 16 when the Russian artillery shell hit. The windowpanes were broken, the walls had holes everywhere and the roof was destroyed. But I renovated everything."

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The repairs cost him several thousand euros. "You have to think positively, because life goes on," he explains with a smile. But this attitude is not so present generally in Saltivka, a neighborhood in northeastern Kharkiv. The dental practice may be like new, but the rest of this area in the northeastern Ukrainian city is completely destroyed.

The Russian army has done a great job in its three-month offensive on Ukraine's second largest metropolis. Countless flats have been burned out, the facades of houses have been shot to pieces, entire shopping centers have been bombed. Debris still lie in the streets everywhere.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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