I read the news today, oh boy
I read the news today, oh boy
Jeff Israely

By now, our regular readers know that Worldcrunch works hard at being of and for and about no one particular place or people or subject matter. Our beat and our audience are written in our name, and we work with journalists and newspapers everywhere to tell the stories (no matter how big or small) that resonate around the world.


Still, as far-flung as we might be, we do have a home, a pretty special one: in Paris, France. As the American-born editor of our atypical and purposefully global news animal, I sometimes find myself guarding against giving too much weight to either the U.S. or France in our daily coverage, trying to be sure readers have a decidedly international view of the world.


Still, it's inevitable that French events (and attitudes) will wind up seeping into our coverage a bit more than those elsewhere. And so it was back on March 17, when this country was put on what would become among the tightest national lockdowns to prevent the further spread of coronavirus.


We had of course been covering the pandemic since soon after it began to spread in China, and on to South Korea and finally to our neighbor across the Alps, in Italy. But when it brought to a halt our own life as we'd known it, something fundamentally changed for us — and thus for our readers too. As our core team dialed in that first Monday, we realized something colleagues in Wuhan, Seoul and Milan had understood earlier: this "story" was now everything.

The nature of this global health pandemic and its shutdown of much of daily life — combined with the inevitable worldwide economic crash to come — is unlike anything I have covered in 25 years in the news business. And for the past two-plus months, our work (beginning with this daily newsletter) has been reshaped into what is effectively a coronavirus news operation — though, like the pandemic itself, as global as ever.


Still, and thankfully, life goes on, and news (good and bad) is happening that is unrelated to COVID-19. China is again cracking down on Hong Kong protesters, U.S. police have killed another unarmed African-American man. Soccer matches are starting back up, even if the stadiums are empty.


And so it is, coincidence or otherwise, one day after French Prime Minister Edouard Philippe announced that this country's lockdown was over, that we too are ready to turn the page — starting with returning this Newsletter back to its original name, Worldcrunch Today.


Coverage no doubt will still largely be focused on the related health and economic crises, but for now, this is just what we call the world. That's, at least, how it looks to us here in Paris.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Coronavirus

Why U.S. Vaccine Diplomacy In Latin America Makes "Good" Sense

Echoing its cultural diplomacy of the early 20th century, the United States is gifting vaccines to Latin America as part of a renewed "good neighbor'' policy.

Waiting to get the vaccine in Nezahualcoyotl, Mexico

Andrea Matallana

-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — Just before and during World War II, the United States' Good Neighbor policy proved a very effective strategy to improve ties with Latin America. Initiated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the policy's main goal was non-interference and non-intervention. The U.S. would instead focus on reciprocal exchanges with their southern neighbors, including through art and cultural diplomacy.

Keep reading... Show less
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS
MOST READ