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Arriving in Beijing on March 17
Arriving in Beijing on March 17

For the coming weeks, Worldcrunch will be delivering daily updates on the coronavirus global pandemic. The insidious path of COVID-19 across the planet teaches is a blunt reminder of how small the world has become. Our network of multilingual journalists are busy finding out what's being reported locally — everywhere — to provide as clear a picture as possible of what it means for all of us at home, around the world.

SPOTLIGHT: CHINA TO CENTRAL AMERICA, HOW TO STOP THE SPREAD

As COVID-19 continues its wildfire advance across the globe, the most hopeful sign has come from China, where the outbreak began. The illness appears, incredibly, to have been contained — almost. It still has far more total cases confirmed (81,000+) than any other country, but on Thursday reported no new locally transmitted cases. The announcement is a milestone in the ongoing pandemic as China's strict lockdown tactics have been a roadmap for other countries now being hit hard.

Still, the situation on the ground in China also comes with a caveat, because despite the absence of new domestic transmissions Thursday, health workers detect 34 new cases the same day of people presumed to have contracted the illness abroad and brought into the country. The numbers raise concerns that China could face "a second wave of infections," as The Guardian reports, and offer a sobering reminder of just how difficult it is to stop the virus' spread in our highly interconnected planet.

That same lesson was also on display yesterday on the other side of the world, in Central America, where the impoverished nations of El Salvador and Nicaragua both reported their first confirmed COVID-19 cases. The yet-to-be-identified Salvadoran patient, according to a report by the online news site El Faro, likely contracted the virus in Italy and entered El Salvador through a "blind spot" along the country's borders, which the government officially closed the day before.

All passenger flights in and out of El Salvador are also frozen, including planes bringing deportees from the United States, which has the highest number of confirmed cases in the Americas. The case in Nicaragua involves a 40-year-old patient who arrived earlier this week from Panama, the Nicaraguan news site Confidencial reports. It is becoming increasingly clear that coronavirus is an enemy that must be fought on two fronts: at home and abroad.

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REUTERS
Reuters is an international news agency headquartered in London, UK. It was founded in 1851 and is now a division of Thomson Reuters. It transmits news in English, French, Arabic, Spanish, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Japanese, Korean, Urdu, and Chinese.
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CLARIN
Clarin is the largest newspaper in Argentina. It was founded in August 1945 and is based in Buenos Aires.
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LE PARISIEN
The leading daily newspaper in Paris, Le Parisien has a national edition called Aujourd'hui en France (Today in France). The newspaper was founded in 1944 by World War II resistance fighters in the occupied capital.
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LA VANGUARDIA
La Vanguardia is a leading daily based in Barcelona, published in both Spanish and Catalan. It was founded in 1881.
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EL PAIS
El País ("The Country") is the highest-circulation daily in Spain. It was founded in Madrid in 1976 and is owned by the Spanish media conglomerate PRISA. Its political alignment is considered center-right.
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THE GUARDIAN
Founded as a local Manchester newspaper in 1821, The Guardian has gone on to become one of the most influential dailies in Britain. The left-leaning newspaper is most recently known for its coverage of the Edward Snowden leaks.
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WORLDCRUNCH
Premium stories from Worldcrunch's own network of multi-lingual journalists in over 30 countries.
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LES ECHOS
France's top business daily, Les Echos covers domestic and international economic, financial and markets news. Founded in 1908, the newspaper has been the property of French luxury good conglomerate LVMH (Moet Hennessy - Louis Vuitton) since 2007.
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DIE WELT
Die Welt ("The World") is a German daily founded in Hamburg in 1946, and currently owned by the Axel Springer AG company, Europe's largest publishing house. Now based in Berlin, Die Welt is sold in more than 130 countries. A Sunday edition called Welt am Sonntag has been published since 1948.
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Geopolitics

As Iran Protests Spread, Regime Is Busy Clinging To Power

Facing resurgent protests in several provinces, Iran's clerical regime now relies on its two usual defenses: brute force and appeasing the West. But its days may be numbered as younger Iranians are increasingly emboldened to demand a different future.

A man repairs a carpet in Tehran, Iran

Elahe Boghrat

-Editorial-

Governing ordinarily consists of assuring the security and welfare of a population or nation, within a state or territory. Take away one element from that equation and the government in question begins to move toward failure, defeat, and perhaps its downfall.

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