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Geopolitics

Our Simmering Beef With Meat — Rise Of The Flexitarians

It causes cancer, harms the planet and is cruel to animals, which is why meat consumption has steadily declined in the West. Some have become vegetarians or even vegans, but there is one much more modest alternative that is spreading.

 in At the Yaguane Meat Processing Plant Cooperative in Argentina.
in At the Yaguane Meat Processing Plant Cooperative in Argentina.
Frank Niedercorn

PARIS — What is the future for beef bourguignon? A month ago, the World Health Organization (WHO) warned that eating red meat causes cancer. A few weeks earlier, a slaughterhouse in the southern French town of Alès closed down after the release of a troubling video of its operations. And last year, the whole of Europe was scandalized by revelations that certain ready-made meals contained horse meat. That's to say nothing of the mad cow disease episode in the 1990s.

After a steady increase after World War II, meat consumption in France reached a peak in 1998, when the average person ate 94 kilograms (207 lbs) of it per year. The consumption decline has been continuous since then, according to FranceAgriMer, which is affiliated with the French Ministry of Agriculture. Specifically, people are eating much less beef and pork, though consumption of poultry has doubled. Other European countries have undergone similar evolutions.

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Mariateresa Fichele

"Dottoré, I know you’re going to say I’m superstitious and strange, you always give rational answers ... but I have to ask you a question: Is it true that ever since our stadium was renamed after Maradona, Napoli doesn't win at home anymore?"

"So?"

"Could it be that Saint Paul, to whom the stadium was initially dedicated, got offended and is making us lose now?"

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