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Economy

My Mentor Is A Millennial: On The Benefits Of Reverse Mentoring

It's called 'reverse mentoring,' where veteran executives get some raw feedback from younger workers. Can it help Latin American business loosen up and build for the future?

Millennial management
Millennial management
Daniela Arce

SANTIAGO — In Chile, Banco Santander has come up with a mortgage plan for millennials. You have more than 40 years to pay it off. It makes sense when millennials and now also their successor Generation Z are an important part of the workforce and their banking customers. Not surprisingly, it was the fruit of a meeting in 2019 between bank directors and young Santander professionals that explored social networks and other tech-related issues. It was an example of what's been dubbed "reverse mentoring" to show executives what the market expects.

When millennials state their hopes and needs to seasoned business hands, it can help executives take another look at a generation reputed to have contradictary ambitions and an aversion to commitment, and perhaps use them to revitalize their businesses. While mentors are usually expected to be experts in their fields, here it is the experts opening themselves to advice.

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Geopolitics

NATO Entry For Sweden And Finland? Erdogan May Not Be Bluffing

When the two Nordic countries confirmed their intention to join NATO this week, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan repeated his plans to block the application. Accusing Sweden and Finland of' "harboring" some of his worst enemies may not allow room for him to climb down.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared opposition to Finland and Sweden entering NATO

Meike Eijsberg

-Analysis-

LONDON — When Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared his opposition to Finland and Sweden entering NATO, it took most of the West's top diplomatic experts by surprise — with the focus squarely on how Russia would react to having two new NATO members in the neighborhood. (So far, that's been a surprise too)

But now Western oversight on Turkey's stance has morphed into a belief in some quarters that Erdogan is just bluffing, trying to get concessions from the negotiations over such a key geopolitical issue.

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To be clear, any prospective NATO member requires the consent of all 30 member states and their parliaments. So Erdogan does indeed have a card to play, which is amplified by the sense of urgency: NATO, Sweden and Finland are keen to complete the accession process with the war in Ukraine raging and the prospect of strengthening the military alliance's position around the Baltic Sea.

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