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Geopolitics

COVID-19 Be Damned: How Poland Is Beating Another Crisis

Compared to other EU member states, Poland was barely affected by the international financial crisis or the refugee crisis of 2015. Now, the country could emerge from the coronavirus pandemic in a stronger position than before.

A man stands with the Polish flag during a National Entrepreneur strike in Warsaw, Poland.
A man stands with the Polish flag during a National Entrepreneur strike in Warsaw, Poland.
Philipp Fritz

WARSAW —There were ten Polish flags fluttering in the background but no sign of European stars when Polish president Andrzej Duda and Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki laid out the positive results of a Europe-wide investment program. The red-and-white flags showed that they considered it their achievement— a Polish achievement. "We wouldn't have had such success," said Morawiecki, "if we'd continued to rest on our laurels."

According to President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen, 750 billion euros will be pumped into Europe's economies to guard against the danger of a post-coronavirus economic crisis. Poland is set to be one of the main beneficiaries, receiving 63 billion euros. Only Italy and Spain, which have been hit particularly hard by Covid-19, are due to receive more.

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The Mural ‘St. Javelina’ depicting a Madonna holding a javelin anti-tank missile that has been crucial for the Ukrainian defense, has been painted on a building of the Solomianskyi district of Kyiv.

Lila Paulou and Lisa Berdet.

👋 Hafa adai!*

Welcome to Friday, where Russia warns about Ukraine attacks inside its territory, a video of deadly Brazilian police violence sparks outrage and a grandmother in New Zealand takes on Elon Musk and Tesla. We also feature a story from Buenos Aires daily Clarin about "Agrotokens," a way that farmers in Argentina are turning surplus grain into a kind of tangible cryptocurrency.

[*Chamorro, Mariana Islands]

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